CONTENTS

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SMPTE Lifetime Achievement Recognition Dinner 2004

Rocky Mtn Section January Meeting report

State Emergency Communications Committee Seeks Chair

Random Radio Thoughts

Certificaton Exam Session Dates

Nominations For SBE Fellow Sought

SBE At NAB2004

Amateur Radio News

FCC Issues Report On Video Competition

Your New Year's Resume Check-Up

The History Of Color TV In America

SBE Signal Wins Award

Mark's Project In Progress

Etc.

 

March, 2004

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SMPTE Lifetime Achievement Recognition Dinner 2004

This year, we honored one of our own, Rome Chelsi, at the Celtic Crossing in beautiful Castle Pines As most of us know, Rome has put in countless hours into our local SMPTE/SBE Chapter along with many hours servicing us in the broadcast and professional communities. As the assembled group dined on Pepper Steak, Rosemary Chicken or Salmon, Brad Torr got things underway with a brief synopsis of Rome's contributions to the industry, and introductions of several folks who shared with us some interesting insights into Rome's life. The list of speakers included Fred Baumgartner, Tom Goldberg, Lawrence Brinton, and A.J. Delizza, whose summary of Rome's 'life outside of his career' was truly revealing.

Brad Torr Presents Rome With A Plaque
Brad Torr Presents Rome With A Plaque

Brad Torr
Brad Torr

Fred Baumgartner
Fred Baumgartner

Tom Goldberg
Tom Goldberg

Lawrence Brinton
Lawrence Brinton

A.J. Delizza
A.J. Delizza

Special thanks to Brad Torr and to Donna Zingelman for doing a fine job of organizing things and making sure all of the necessary paperwork was handled.

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Rocky Mtn Section January Meeting Report

The successful landing of the second Mars rover brought into focus the Rocky Mountain section's January meeting at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. Our hosts, Roger Gunderson and Vaughn Hoxie of LASP provided a tour and insight into the instrumentation which is custom developed by LASP in Boulder Colorado. The facility, which is part of the University of Colorado has been intimately involved with NASA since the 1950s in developing insturments which study atmospheric conditions on earth and planets within the solar-system. For additional information, the LASP URL: http://lasp.colorado.edu/

We thank Roger and Vaughn for taking time from their busy schedules to accomodate our membership.

Date: January 14, 2004
Attendees: 25
Location: Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Research, Boulder, CO

Roger Gunderson of LASP hosts tour
Roger Gunderson of LASP hosts tour

Cool Gear
Cool Gear

More Cool Gear
More Cool Gear

Looking At Exibits
Looking At Exibits

Rome Chelsi and Fred Baumgartner
Rome Chelsi and Fred Baumgartner

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State Emergency Communications Committee Seeks Chair

From: Jon Sprague, Denver FCC Field Office

The Colorado State Emergency Communications Committee asked me to check with the local SBE Chapter 48 group and solicit if anyone is interested in the recently vacated Colorado EAS State Chair and Local Metro Area 3 EAS chair for broadcast. Of course it is a non-paying position and the position has not been very time consuming in the past few years. However, in the planning stages are a June 2004 EAS conference in Denver and maybe for the West Slope too, the old state and local plan is being revised to 2004, and chair approval/disapproval of new EAS monitoring requests. So there may be some additional work for the position in early-mid 2004, but that will pass once the conference and EAS plans are finished.

So if you can pass it on to the membership, it would be appreciated. Any willing volunteers can call Richard Bardsley at State OEM in Golden at 303-273-1619 or me at 303-231-5205 ext 208.

Best Regards
Jon

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Random Radio Thoughts


Cris Alexander, CSRE
Crawford Broadcasting Company

LPFM
Just when we thought the LPFM rush was about over, the FCC wants to increase the number of LPFM stations that are on the air. The mechanism for doing this is the elimination of third-adjacent protection. This recommendation comes from the "Mitre Report", which was presented to the FCC late last year. The NAB has come out with guns blazing, citing serious deficiencies in the report, measurement methodology, etc., but it seems the FCC doesn't want to be confused with the facts and has its mind made up. It is running with the elimination of third adjacent protections of existing full-service FM stations, FM translators and FM boosters by LPFMs. You might recall that third-adjacent channel protections were part of the District of Columbia Appropriations Act of 2001. Also part of the Act was a requirement for "Phase II" receiver testing, and the FCC is asking Congress to waive that requirement as well. All this may get some sympathetic ears in Congress, where many feel that consolidation has gone too far. Some in Congress reportedly see LPFM as a means to return local service and some control of the public airwaves to communities.

I haven't taken a look at the Denver market yet to see if there is any potential impact. Perhaps I'll find time to run a "what-if" scenario or two before next month. My guess is that we will be seeing some LPFMs in and around the metro area within the next couple of years.

Mexican Interference
I mentioned the 560 kHz Mexican interference in last month's newsletter. The story continues. Agents from the Denver FCC CIB office contacted Crawford's market CE Ed Dulaney in mid-February to arrange for some "interference measurements". Evidently, the Mexicans had agreed to shut their 560 Tecate station down for a few hours on one night for some "control" measurements.

While Crawford certainly appreciates the CIB's willingness to step in and make something happen, we were concerned by a couple of things. One was that any short-term measurements would be meaningless, but the results could be construed to "prove" just about anything. Skywave fields vary widely from night to night, from season to season and from year to year. To get any meaningful data from skywave measurements, one would have to take nightly measurements over an entire eleven-year sunspot cycle. A spot measurement might show very little interference, or a ton of it. There's no way to tell.

The other concern was that the very act of making measurement somewhat legitimizes the treaty violation by the Mexicans. Our position is that the Mexicans are either in compliance with the treaty or they are not, and this is established by the notification/study procedures contained in the 1986 Mexican Agreement. By the language in the Agreement, the station's very presence very clearly violates the treaty. Making measurements suggests that even though the station exists, perhaps it does not produce interference.

Crawford argued these things to the local CIB agent, and evidently the argument was taken to heart. The Colorado measurements as well as some simultaneous measurements planned for California were called off. As far as we know, the ball is back in the diplomatic court now. Thanks to the CIB folks for trying. We do appreciate your efforts.

In addition to the 560 kHz mess, there are similar situations on 780 and 920 kHz. On 920, XEDD is reportedly about to fire up on a new tower located on Rosarita Beach near Tijuana. This is the same structure used by XESS on 780 kHz. When XEDD fires up, I suspect that KLMR in Lamar will begin getting hammered at night. When Tim Cutforth's Pueblo 780 kHz application is eventually granted, Tim may well find that the RSS night limit is a bit higher than he originally calculated.

If the Mexicans are allowed to get away with this treaty violation with impunity, we suggest that the FCC allow all domestic stations operating on Mexican clear channels or otherwise protecting Mexican allocations be allowed to increase power or alter patterns to fully protect all domestic allocations but ignore the Mexican protections. For KLVZ here in Denver, that would mean about 300 watts ND at night; for KLDC, it would mean about 200 watts. What's good for the goose...

AM HD Interference
As HD radio continues to grow, a few AM stations are beginning to fire up with digital carriers. Many of you have no doubt read the accounts in the trade publications. The results, particularly of the WOR tests in New York, have been very encouraging.

Like FM IBOC, however, AM IBOC does occupy "new" spectrum, i.e. spectrum that is fully within the FCC-specified RF mask but where there has until now been little or no radiated energy. In late February, KXME in Orange, California reportedly fired up its digital carriers. Listeners to adjacent-channel stations in Southern California are reporting "horrendous digital sideband noise" coming from the station. Indeed, spectrum analysis of the station's emissions from a remote monitoring point show sideband energy that is about -20 dBc at +/- 15 kHz. §73.44(b) requires emissions 10.2 to 20 kHz removed from carrier be attenuated by at least 25 dB below the unmodulated carrier level. It's always hard to get a clean spectrum shot from a remote location, so I suspect that KXME is actually in compliance with §73.44.

Whatever the case, the point is that there's no free ride here. The digital energy has to reside somewhere, and in the hybrid system, that somewhere is in the sidebands, under the mask. That necessarily comes at the expense of adjacent channel interference.

If everything works right, this should not produce interference within the protected contour of any station. The trouble is, lots of people listen outside the protected contour, and those are the listeners that will lose the ability to listen to the adjacent-channel stations. Consider that at night, skywave propagation will result in the power of the digital sidebands from many adjacencies adding together to raise the RSS night limit of just about every station on the air, and you begin to get the picture that analog nighttime service areas will shrink - considerably.

The FCC was petitioned last month to allow AM nighttime IBOC transmissions. The NAB board said, in essence, that the gain would be worth the pain. Certainly AM stands to gain the most, but it would hardly be worthwhile for daytime only operation. Nighttime operation is key to the success of AM HD, but at what cost? I would be interested to hear what you think.

FM HD Observations
I spent a few days recently in Chicago, listening to our several HD-equipped FM stations. The sound is incredible. Using Omnia6.HDFM processors, we have been able to duplicate the "signature sound" of our stations on both the analog and HD signals, leaving off the heavy AGC and clipping on the HD. The result is sweet!

We continue to learn, however, as we get deeper and deeper into this HD thing. One thing we have learned over the past month or so is that in high-level combined systems, the reject load needs to be rated for 90% of the peak digital power plus 10% of the analog power. Manufacturers had previously told us to consider only the average digital power in the equation, and we smoked one load after a few months of operation. Clearly, factors such as peak duration and peak-to-average ratio come into play. We are upsizing all our loads. You might keep that in mind if you plan to convert to HD anytime soon.

If you have news you would like to share with the Denver radio engineering community, email me at crisa@crawfordbroadcasting.com.

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Certificaton Exam Session Dates Announced For 2003

2004 Exam Dates

Location

Application Deadline

April 20

NAB - Las Vegas

March 2, 2004

June 4-14

Local Chapters

April 23, 2004

August 13-23

Local Chapters

June 11, 2004

November 12-22

Local Chapters

September 24, 2004

Please note: SBE Certification exams are administered only by SBE and are proctored in-person by qualified and approved representatives of SBE. No other organization is authorized to administer SBE exams.

Society of Broadcast Engineers, Inc.
9247 North Meridian Street, Suite 305
Indianapolis, IN 46260
Phone: (317) 846-9000
Fax: (317) 846-9120

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Nominations For SBE Fellow Sought

A reminder that the SBE Fellowship Committee is accepting nominations of qualified members to be considered for recognition as SBE Fellows. To submit a nomination, send to: Martin Sandberg, CPBE, Chairman, SBE Fellowship Committee, 9807 Edgecove Drive, Dallas, Texas, 75238-1535 or to sandytex@swbell.net. Nominations for presentation in 2004 must be received no later than March 31 for consideration.

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SBE At NAB2004

INSERT AUTHOR HERE

SBE is partnering with NAB for the 10th consecutive year to present the NAB Broadcast Engineering Conference (BEC). The Conference is a part of NAB's annual spring convention, this year held from April 17-22 in Las Vegas. As a part of the BEC, SBE and the Ennes Educational Foundation Trust will present a special Ennes Workshop, titled, "It's an IT World. Converting Broadcast Operations to an Information Technology Platform," on Saturday from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. A complete rundown of the Ennes Workshop program can be found in the February issue of the SBE Signal and online, at www.sbe.org. To attend, you must be a full-conference registrant through NAB.

SBE Discount Registration: SBE members who are not eligible for the NAB Member rate can register at the SBE Partner rate. This is a savings of $200 from the NAB Non-Member rate. You must use the special registration form for SBE members which can only be found on the SBE web site or direct from the SBE National Office.

SBE Booth: SBE will be located in Lobby Booth 17, which is down the Central Hall from the main entrance and across from Central Exhibit Hall 4. It is also adjacent to the Broadcast Engineering Conference session rooms, N110 and N112. The booth will be open Sunday from 2 pm to 5 pm, Monday through Wednesday from 9 am to 6 pm and Thursday from 9 am to 4 pm. We will have the new Certification Practice Test CDs, discounted technical books and SBE logo items. Don't forget to pick up your 40th Anniversary SBE Member Ribbon for your convention name badge.

SBE Meetings: SBE holds a number of meetings that members are welcome to participate in. The list is subject to change so confirm this information before leaving for the convention.

Board of Directors Meeting, Sunday, 8:30 AM, Grand/Royal Salon, Las Vegas Hilton
EAS Meeting, Monday, 2:00 pm, Las Vegas Convention Center*
Frequency Coordinators Meeting, Tuesday, 10:00 AM, Conf. Rooms 4/5, Las Vegas Hilton
Membership Meeting, Tuesday, 5:00 pm, Las Vegas Convention Center
SBE will celebrate its 40th Anniversary during the Membership Meeting.
Engineer Friendly Documentation Committee Mtg., 1:30 pm, Las Vegas Convention Center*
* Room to be announced

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Amateur Radio News

By Tom Weeden,WJ9H
Chapter 24 - Madison

o The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) wants the FCC to create a new entry-level license, reduce the number of actual license classes to three, and drop the Morse code testing requirement for all classes except for Amateur Extra. The ARRL has filed a Petition for Rule Making asking the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules to complete the Amateur Radio Service restructuring the Commission began in 1999 but, in ARRL's opinion, left unfinished. The League says its petition follows in the footsteps of changes in Article 25 of the international Radio Regulations adopted at the World Radiocommunication Conference 2003. Among those changes, WRC-03 deleted the Morse testing requirement for amateur applicants seeking HF privileges and left it up to individual countries to determine whether or not they want to mandate Morse testing. While several countries-including Germany, the UK and Australia-already have dropped their Morse testing requirements, the ARRL emphasized in its petition that Morse code is not the primary issue at hand.

"Changes in Morse telegraphy are one aspect of the proposal, and it would be insufficient for the Commission to address those issues in a vacuum," the League said, calling its licensing proposal "a plan for the next decade." The ARRL said that plan's overall intention is "to encourage newcomers to the Amateur Service and to encourage those who enter its ranks to proceed further on a course of technical self-training and exposure to all aspects of the avocation." Last fall various parties filed a total of 14 Morse-related petitions with the FCC. Several called on the Commission to drop the Morse requirement altogether, while others proposed to keep and even expand the requirement or put forth various license restructuring schemes of their own. The petitions attracted thousands of comments from the amateur community.

"Now, the issue is not merely whether there should or should not be Morse telegraphy as an examination requirement," the ARRL said, "but rather what is the best overall approach for positioning the Amateur Service for future growth and incentive-based self-training."

o The AO-40 amateur radio satellite went silent January 27th, and ground controllers are still trying to figure out just what happened aboard the spacecraft to cause a significant drop in the bus voltage. AO-40 controllers are fairly certain that one or more shorted battery cells are at the root of the problem. Efforts to restart the satellite's 2.4-GHz downlink transmitter so far have been unsuccessful.

"Our current best understanding is that we suffered a catastrophic failure of the main battery, which is clamping the bus voltage at a low level," according to Stacey Mills, W4SM, of the AO-40 command team. "Accordingly, we have been concentrating our efforts on trying to connect the auxiliary battery to the main bus and disconnect the main battery, placing it on trickle charge for further analysis." The AO-40 ground team is sending blind commands to the spacecraft to activate its onboard computerized control system in order to switch in the auxiliary battery bank, which was tied to the main battery bank after the bus voltage drop January 26th.

(Excerpts from the www.arrl.org web site)

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Fcc Issues Report On Video Competition

By Tom Smith

The FCC has released its Tenth Annual Report on Video Competition. This report lists the gains and losses of the various video suppliers over the last year, and describes the changes over the last ten years. This report mainly concerns non-broadcast video suppliers including cable, satellite, broadband, and home video sales.

In 1993, cable TV made up nearly 100% of the market; now with 65.9 million subscribers, cable controls 75% of the market. Direct Broadcast Satellite with 20 million subscribers has 21.6% of the market They had 11.6% growth in the last year. Wireless Cable (MMDS) has 200,000 subscribers or .21% of the market. MMDS has lost 800,000 subscribers since its peak in 1998, and 280,000 in the last year. Private cable serving apartment and condo complexes have 1.2 million subscribers or 1.27% of the market. They lost 400,000 subscribers in the last year.

The report is 147 pages, but the press release with its attached fact sheet is 10 pages and gives an overview of the state of the industry. The report can be very useful in long range planning, as it can provide information on many industry trends.

From FCC Press Release (www.fcc.gov)

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Your New Year's Resume Check-Up

Thanks To Seattle Chapter 16
by
Deborah Walker, CCMC
Resume Writer--Career Coach

Like millions of people coast to coast, you have probably resolved to start 2004 with renewed job-search enthusiasm. If it has been a while since you brushed up your old résumé, you'll want to begin your job search with a New Year's résumé check up. These five questions will help you focus your résumé for even better results in the new year.

1. Has your career objective changed since your last job search?

More specifically, are you attempting to change your industry or profession? If so, your résumé requires a new marketing message based on your transferable skills. This will help potential employers see you outside of the context of your current industry or profession.

Remember, a résumé is more than just an historical document; it is the print ad of your job- search campaign. For peak effectiveness, your résumé should be based on the buying motives of your new target audience. Communicating your transferable skills is an excellent way to tap into employer buying motives.

2. Does your current résumé reflect your professional growth—or are you still using the same résumé format that got you your first job out of college?

As you grow professionally, you'll need a résumé that reflects your level of professionalism. The more sophisticated "hybrid" format allows you to showcase your best accomplishments based on the strategic "selling points" of your career.

3. Does your résumé feature accomplishments from top to bottom?

The best way to capture employer's attention and create a strong first impression is with measurable accomplishments. Accomplishments are most significant when they demonstrate your contribution to an employer's bottom line. If your résumé focuses more on what you did than on how well you did it, it's time to rewrite those "features" into "benefits."

4. Was your last job search prior to 2001?

That may seem like an odd question, but if this is your first entrance into the job market since before 2001, you're in for a shock. The job market of the late '90s was fantastically in favor of job seekers; résumés were less important in attracting employer attention. Today's job market, however, is fiercely competitive, and a polished, professional résumé is critical to winning an employer's notice. If your last job search was a "walk in the park," look objectively at your résumé. Does it have what it takes to compete against an avalanche of candidate responses or will it likely get lost at the bottom of the résumé pile?

5. Most important—are you getting responses from your résumé?

Here's the real proof. Your résumé has only one job: to get you interviews. If that isn't happening, don't just blame the job market—improve your message. Think of your job search as a professional marketing campaign in a saturated market. The tougher the competition, the more vitally important it is to have a résumé with a strong marketing message that sets you above the crowd.

Deborah Walker, CCMC
Résumé Writer ~ Career Coach
Deb@AlphaAdvantage.com
Toll-free phone: 888-828-0814

For more in-depth information on résumés, job-search strategy and interview skills, check out the article archive at my website: www.AlphaAdvantage.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Editor's Note: This article and many more like it can be found on this web site at http://www.smpte-sbe48.org/jobs_tips.html.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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The History Of Color TV In America

Frank Beacham
Thanks to Phoenix Chapter 9

It was fifty years ago on New Year's day that NBC made history with the first live national broadcast in "living color," over a 22 city network hastily constructed by AT&T. The event, the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, Calif., was tailor-made to demonstrate color television technology.

Only a few thousand people actually saw the parade in color on TV that day. For the occasion, RCA built a special run of only 200 color sets-designated the Model 5 (the prototype number)-for the NBC affiliates and RCA Victor retail distributors. Other manufacturers, wanting to enter the color TV business, also built their own prototypes for the occasion. The idea was to build excitement about color TV, and it did.

The first consumer color televisions hit the market a few weeks later, with 5,000 units rolling off the RCA assembly line in Bloomington, Ind. in March 1954. Nicknamed "the Merrill," the RCA Model CT100 had a 12-inch diagonal screen and cost a whopping $1,000 (well over $6,000 by today's standards).

Since only 31 stations in the United States had color capability, there wasn't much to watch. In fact, any color program broadcast in the 1950s was a big event. Just before the inaugural live Rose Parade broadcast, the first filmed series to have a color episode aired was "Dragnet" in December 1953. Other notable events were the first color broadcast of a president (Dwight Eisenhower in June 1955) and the first color broadcast of the World Series (Dodgers vs. Yankees in September 1955). Even with these special broadcasts, it would be a long time before most Americans experienced color television in their living rooms. Those indelible images from the November 1963 Kennedy assassination-ten years after the Rose parade colorcast-were still in black and white. The tide began to turn in the early '60s, after about half-a-million color sets had been sold. Walt Disney's "Wonderful World of Color" began in 1961. The first color cartoons, the "Flintstones" and the "Jetsons," began in the fall of 1962. However, to baby boomers and their parents, one show would come to define the move to color television. The first episode of "Bonanza" aired on Sept. 12, 1959. Shot on location in the scenic Lake Tahoe area, this NBC western was filmed in color to showcase color technology from RCA; NBC's parent corporation. At first, Bonanza aired on Saturday nights, where it bombed in the ratings. Kept alive simply because it was in color, the show was moved after its first two seasons to Sunday nights, where it found an audience and became a huge hit for 14 seasons.

From 1964 to 1967, "Bonanza" was the single most watched television program in America. The year 1966 also signaled NBC's switch to an all-color network. During this period, sales of color television sets finally took off. By the end of '60s, the black-and-white era was over. As with the current transition to digital television, the road to color also took a complex, tortured path. The earliest recorded patent for color television dates back to 1904 in Germany. A steady stream of developments occurred from then on. In 1940, CBS, under the leadership of Peter Goldmark, designed a mechanical color system based on designs from the 1920s. In 1950, the FCC named the CBS technology-called the Field Sequential Color System-the U.S. national standard.

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SBE Signal Wins Award

The SBE Signal, the bi-monthly membership publication of the Society, recently was recognized by the Indiana Society of Association Executives (ISAE) as Indiana's best association-published newsletter. ISAE cited the Signal for its appearance, content, and profitability, producing non-dues income to help offset the Society's expenses. Angel Bates, SBE's Membership Services Director, is responsible for the production and advertising sales of the Signal. Angel and John Poray were present to accept the award from ISAE at that organization's awards dinner held last month in Indianapolis.

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Mark's Project In Progress

From: Mark Durenberger

Hi Bill; thought you might be interested in my Great Big Utah Desert Beverage Project in mid-February. I have an 1800-footer set up, East-West, and will be doing some recordings for the DX Audio Service, the radio magazine for the Blind. The project includes keeping watch on selected 1-A and 1-B AM channels to see how different they sound in the far field, when they switch between day/night facilities.

I've picked a group of channels that have primary stations to the East and secondary stations in the West.

Alas, the second try at the Utah Beverage project ran afoul of cold temps and lots of snow. I'll try again on March 11th. I hate to wait so long, because the DX season will be tapering off, but...no choice.

Mark's Project In Progress

Here's a photo of the dual (8-receiver) arrays...4 receivers go on each end of the Beverage, for simultaneous bi-directional copy of identical channels. One array is listening to the East; the other to the West. You'll also note RF gain blocks mounted just beneath the YachtBoy radio...it's a Kiwa 10db low-noise amp with built-in Beverage termination and a nice low source impedance so it can drive several radios.

Hopefully this thing will work a-okay; my only concern is whether the DX season will be over by mid-March.

I'll keep you posted on this project.

Mark Durenberger

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Etc.

Newsletter Committee

Bill Harris
  (303)756-4843
   billharris@ix.netcom.com

Garneth M. Harris
  (303)756-4843

Newsletter archives are available online.

Visit www.smpte-sbe48.org/oldnews for an index of newsletter back issues.
Note: Old newsletters may contain outdated information, web links or email addresses. News archives are not updated when relevant information changes.

Views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the Societies, its officers, or its members. We regret, but are not liable for, any omissions or errors. The Denver SBE and SMPTE Newsletter is published approximately twelve times per year. It is prepared with a combination of text and graphic data. Submission deadline is 10 days before the last day of each month. Other SBE or SMPTE chapters are permitted to use excerpts if attributed to the original authors, sources, and/or the Denver SBE/SMPTE Newsletter.