CONTENTS

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2002 Picnic On The Mount Well Attended

Certification Update

Short Circuits July 2002

More News On Upgrades

FCC Checks Hot Spots at Mt. Wilson

Digital Cinematography Center Highlight of Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo October 2-3

New for Expo 2002!!

Static Line

Amateur Radio News

Arbitron Portable People Meter Will Change Everything

Security: Number One in Our Job !

Vacuum-Tubed Pc Motherboard

Some Call Them Groaners!

Humor

Etc.

 

February, 2002

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2002 Picnic On The Mount Well Attended

Fred Baumgartner, Chair, SBE Chapter 48

The 11th annual SBE/SMPTE picnic was invaded by 78, relatively hungry, predominately aging male, RF junkies of all sorts. We appreciate very very much the support of our sponsors... Mike Wright, Thompson Grass Valley; Brad Torr, Leitch; Howard McClure, Itelco; and Kirk Basefsky Burst. Bill Harris made out a very large $1,000 check to the Ennes foundation. The foundation supplies scholarships to broadcast engineering students, and supports broadcast engineering educational programs. It is certainly nice to continue Denver's tradition, from Tower training and EAS, of playing a role at the National Level.

Incidentally, we also turned over VHS tapes of the Zenith seminar done here in January to the SBE Lending Library. The library maintains tapes for groups and individuals that may not be able to travel to or missed a topic to borrow, free of charge, a taped copy of the event. If you missed January, maybe you'd like to check out a copy?


Danny Valenzuela from KXKL/KIMN/KDJM in Denver and Clayton Creekmore, Director of Engineering, Entercom Stations, Denver.

Speaking of checks and tapes and such... We did Fed-X Linda Godby at the SBE office, a plate of brownies which made it to the lunch room table in Indianapolis the next morning. The world is getting smaller. I understand that Bill has several pictures, and given that pictures are worth a thousand words, and we've received several inquiries from the office of homeland security, we'll simply leave the pictures to speak for themselves. (See Above!)

-30-

KWGN... or is that KFEL... made it to it's 50th anniversary this month. The WB-2 "Veranda" has been the site of the annual picnic for every year except the first year (Morrison uplink 1991) and this year (one interesting side note is that soda consumption averaged 2.7 cans per capita at KWGN, and only 1.2 at the park... I presume it was the shade?).

There was a bunch of old junk... I mean the remains of original antennas and projects below the concrete pad that constituted the veranda (and before that the Quonset hut that was the transmitter building before Peter built that air conditioned thing with the no-tubes "transmitter") at the TV-2 site. TV came to the cow-towns a bit later than it did the rest of the world. Fact was that the color "standard" was being enacted just about the time KFEL hit the air with the Dumont network. One might note that there are two towers at the site. The 6-bay on the short stick is now the back-up, and the 4-bay on the big tower the main. One neat thing was that when one simply swapped antennas without cranking down the transmitter power... well you do the math. I suppose it's all history now.

KWGN did sponsor a picnic on the 24th for the current and X-employees. I'm especially grateful as I won a jacket with the call letters... to compliment my TV-2 sweater from my brief stay there. There were a lot of prizes. Actually... probably one-half the folks in this town did a tour at KWGN. And now... we're off the deck so they can build some sort of DTV transmitter... my how time flies...

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Certification Update

From Fred Baumgartner
Chapter 48 Certification Chair

Hi Fred,

Linda and I would like to let you and the rest of your chapter know that the following members have successfully completed another level of certification.

Patrick Griffith CBRE
Michael Snyder CSTE

Sincerely,
Pamela Hyde
Certification Assistant
"Stay Cool!!"

Congratulations to Patrick and Mike. Mike starts his new position as CE at a TV in Fresno CA starting in August!

The SBE National Certification Committee has announced exam session dates for 2002-03. Check the list below for the exam period that is best for you. For more information about SBE Certification, contact Chapter Certification Chair Fred Baumgartner baumgartner.fred.m@broadband.att.com, or contact Linda Godby, Certification Director at the SBE National Office at (317) 846-9000 or LGodby@sbe.org.

2002 Exam Dates

Location

Application Deadline

August 16-26, 2002

Local Chapters

Closed

November 9-19, 2002

Local Chapters

September 29, 2002

 

 

 

2003 Exam Dates

Location

Application Deadline

February 7-17, 2003

Local Chapters

December 31, 2002

April 8, 2003

NAB - Las Vegas

March 1, 2003

June 6-16, 2003

Local Chapters

April 25, 2003

August 15-25, 2003

Local Chapters

June 13, 2003

November 7-17, 2003

Local Chapters

September 26, 2003

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Short Circuits July 2002

PHOENIX TO HOST SBE NATIONAL MEETING
SBE Chapter 9 in Phoenix, Arizona, in cooperation with the Arizona Broadcasters Association, will host the SBE National Meeting as a part of it's SBE regional convention. The National Meeting will begin on Wednesday, October 16 with the National Certification Committee meeting from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, followed by the fall National Board of Directors meeting at 6:00 pm. Both meetings will take place at the downtown Hyatt Regency Hotel. On Thursday, National Meeting events will include the annual Fellows Reunion (this year, a luncheon), Annual Membership Meeting at 5:00 pm and the Annual SBE National Awards Reception and Dinner beginning at 6:00 pm.

Thursday will also be the day of the Regional Convention, with a broadcast equipment tradeshow and educational sessions. All of Thursday's events will take place at the Phoenix Civic Plaza, across the street from the Hyatt Regency.

Admission to the Regional Convention exhibits and educational sessions is free. Tickets for the National Awards Dinner and the reception that precedes it are $12 and can be ordered from the SBE National Office at (317) 846-9000 or by e-mailing Linda Godby at lgodby@sbe.org. Make checks payable to SBE. American Express, VISA and Master Card are also accepted.

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE GRAND PRIZE WINNER CHOSEN
The SBE Membership Drive concluded on May 31 with 58 new-member sponsors participating and over 60 new members recruited directly as a result of the Drive. Prizes were drawn on June 22 during the SBE Executive Committee meeting in Birmingham, AL.

The Grand Prize winner of a trip for one to the SBE National Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, October 16-18, 2002 AND a Panasonic TV, compliments of SBE and Panasonic is Steve West of Chapter 29 in Corpus Christi, Texas! Steve recruited two members during the Drive, Martin Wind and Felipe Franco. The 1st prize entertainment package of an RCA 27" Stereo Monitor-Receiver TV, compliments of Thomson Multimedia Broadcast & Network Solutions, a DVD Player, compliments of Acrodyne and a Freeplay, Freepower Radio, compliments of Broadcast Richardson is Ralph Hogan of Chapter 117 in Palouse/Clearwater, Idaho. All 58 recruiters won a prize and all will be getting $5.00 off their 2003 Membership renewal for each new member recruited during the Drive. Our thanks to all the members who participated in the Drive and to the many Sustaining Member companies that donated prizes.

LIFE MEMBERSHIP FEE ADOPTED
The SBE Board of Directors has approved a recommendation from the Membership Committee to institute a fee for those applying for Life Membership, affective October 1, 2002. Beginning on that date, applicants will need to include a one-time fee of $35 when applying for Life Membership. Life Membership following the initial application year will remain free. Only those members who make application for Life Membership beginning October 1, 2002 are affected. Current Life Members and those who make application through September 31, 2002 are not affected by the new fee. The revenue generated by the new fee is to help cover rising operational costs.

To be eligible for Life Membership, an applicant must have been a member in good standing (dues paid) for ten consecutive years immediately prior to applying and be retired from full time broadcast engineering employment. Application for Life Membership is made on a form available from the National Office. Life Members receive the same benefits as Regular members, have full access to SBE services and maintain their voting privileges.

SBE RESUME SERVICE GOES ON-LINE
The SBE Resume Service is now online! With increased visibility and ease of use, the Resume Service is the perfect companion to JobsOnline for both SBE members searching for new positions and potential employers searching for the right candidates. SBE members complete a questionnaire and send the national office copies of their resumes. To guard the confidentiality of our members, anonymous "resume profiles" will be constructed from the information provided in the member questionnaire. The resume profile will be comprised of the position a candidate is seeking, his or her experience in different broadcast areas and management; education credentials; desired market size; language skills and preferred location of employment. Each profile will be assigned an identification number that prospective employers will use to make requests, and members can use to monitor their posting. Individual profiles will be posted for six months, unless a member requests to either be removed or have his or her term extended. Employers interested in one or more candidate profiles can contact the national office, and for a small fee, receive copies of the resumes for the candidates they want.

Only SBE Members in good standing may submit resumes to the Resume Service. There is no charge to do so. A Member Questionnaire can be downloaded from the SBE website or requested from the national office. Any broadcast-related employer may request complete resumes from the Resume Service for a fee of $35, payable in advance, by company check or credit card. All Resume Service queries should be sent to the attention of Membership Services Director Angel D. Bates at abates@sbe.org, (317) 846-9000, fax (317) 846-9120 or Society of Broadcast Engineers, 9247 North Meridian Street, Suite 305, Indianapolis, IN 46260.

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More News On Upgrades

by Chris Murray
Chair, Oregon SECC
ichabod@kknu.com

I had a conversation with Kathy Kuwano kkuwano@tftinc.com at TFT about upgrades that might be a problem for those TFT 911 EAS Encoders. This only applies to those units that have the "Audio Expander Board" that allows the unit to monitor six audio inputs. There are two E-proms on the quad audio expander board, U208 and U209. If the set of E-PROMS are v.75 or lower, please request v.79.

This will ensure that the new firmware/software/Amber Plan will function properly in your EAS 911. According to Kathy, there will not be a charge for the upgrades on the audio board, only the Firmware upgrade to the version .840.

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FCC Checks Hot Spots at Mt. Wilson

The following information comes from the CGC Communicator
http://www.bext.com/_CGC/

Today [Friday, July 12, 2002], the FCC, in an unprecedented move, shut down every Los Angeles FM and TV station operating from Mt. Wilson in a surprise RF hazard inspection.The situation seems to have started a few weeks ago with the attempted installation of a new antenna for station KDOC, CH-56.

KDOC is located in the ground floor of the building known as the "Post Office." The KDOC antenna was to be mounted on a 150' pole [actually a 226' pole -Ed.] directly West of the Post office. KDOC engineers had calculated the stations that needed to reduce power and had sent out requests. When it came time to climb the pole, the tower crew found that the RF levels were still too high.

They eventually found that the offending signal was from an FM station that was not on the KDOC list of stations that needed to reduce power. The station's engineer was called and asked to reduce power to 80%. He was willing to comply but was overruled by a corporate engineer saying, "I can't reduce power while everyone is listening to my morning man!" (Note that the FCC order obliges stations to comply with requests to lower power as a safety matter and without regard to ratings or revenue issues. The corporate engineer may not have known that he was exposing his company to many thousands of dollars in fines.) The FM station, after a week of negotiating, finally agreed to cooperate.

Yesterday, a team of six FCC "agents" arrived at Mt. Wilson. Their first step was to perform a field intensity survey of their own. They located a site that, according to their instruments, did not meet the safety levels for public access. The site is the KMEX driveway as it rises up behind KBIG and until it reaches the KMEX building. Since there has been considerable construction in that driveway over the past few years, the gate has long since disappeared. Since there is no gate, the driveway is publicly accessible and therefore in violation. It would not have been a violation if there had been a chain across the driveway and a "No Trespassing" sign. (Ed note: Apparently there was a chain but it was down on that day due to work in progress.)

Today, the FCC showed up ready to find out who was responsible for that hot-spot in the driveway. They had called the Chief Engineers of every station to meet at Mt. Wilson at 12:00 noon.... They set up their meter at the hot-spot and then asked each station to shut down completely, one-by-one, just long enough to make another measurement. Most stations were off for from 20 seconds to 40 seconds. This process actually took hours to complete as communications was difficult between each transmitter and the man taking the measurements. The Fox-lot stations were then asked to do the same thing for another hot-spot over there. After all of the measurements were done, everyone met at the Mt. Wilson Pavilion to discuss the situation.

The agents said that they were not able to review the measurements in the field. Once they were reviewed at the office, there would be Notices of Violations and Notices of Liability (fines.) Many of the Chiefs felt that the stations exceeding the limits would probably be a handful of close-by FMs. The agents then spent a considerable time explaining the rules and the FCC's expectations. They said that the rules have been in place for several years now, and that they were no longer warning people, but enforcing the law. There was also a Q&A time. There was also considerable talk about a group of stations joining to have a new, comprehensive field study done by a qualified engineering firm. Such studies are required for licensees under the new rules. The last time this was done was in 1998 by Hammett & Edison. While some stations have shown little interest in joining the group, there is clearly a cost and accuracy benefit in having as many stations as possible join the group. Perhaps this incident will change the minds of the stations that show little interest. They are still looking for bids and there is not yet a cost estimate.

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Digital Cinematography Center Highlight of Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo October 2-3

American Society of Cinematographers' President Steven Poster to Speak

DENVER-July 11, 2002- The Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo (RMFV) has set October 2 & 3 as the dates for EXPO 2002 at the Denver International Airport Holiday Inn.

Following the theme "Science of the Art," the Expo will feature a new Digital Cinematography Center where filmmakers, production professionals and broadcasters will gain hands-on creative and technical experience with motion picture cameras, high definition cameras and new digital tools.

Steven Poster, president of the American Society of Cinematographers, Larry Thorpe, vice president of Acquisition Systems for Sony Electronics and Bill Russell, vice president of Arriflex Corporation are featured speakers and panelists for discussions on the digital movement. The Digital Center will offer two days of seminars and demonstrations designed to give production professionals, filmmakers, content creators, producers and directors an enriched, hands-on experience with information focused on the industry's transition to new digital technologies. Special attention will be given to the creative choices that professionals face on a daily basis. Seminar and discussion topics will include the Art of the Cinematographer, SMPTE standards, mastering, compression, projection and business and regulatory issues.

According Kay Baker, of Film Video Equipment Service Co., Inc. in Denver, digital cinema is not HDTV on a big screen. "It's an enhanced film experience with a cleaner, sharper, visually richer picture that more closely represents the creative intent of the filmmaker," she says. "It's the newest technology that is driving the motion picture and broadcast industries and it adds new dimensions professionals need to understand."

Within the Center, the Digital Cinematography Screening Room will offer an exciting line up of 35mm film and high definition 24P programs, shorts, trailers and side-by-side comparisons between 24P and 35mm film.

The 2002 Expo will also feature timely educational seminars and speakers covering a wide range of industries, such as telecommunications, the Internet, e-commerce, corporate training, advertising, sales and marketing. Returning this year are the "Multi-media Showcase," which highlights the latest in high-definition television, digital cameras, Web tools, and other new media equipment; and "Projector Alley," where exhibitors demonstrate their newest projection equipment. More than 150 exhibitors will exhibit and demonstrate the latest equipment and product offerings.

The Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo, which will celebrate its 17th year in 2002, is sponsored by Burst Communications, CEAVCO Audio-Visual, and Film/Video Equipment Service Company, Inc. For more information, visit the RMFV Expo web site at www.rmfve.com, or call Expo manager Mark Cramer at ExpoMasters, at 303-771-2000.

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New for Expo 2002!!

Digital Cinematography Center

Expo 2002 announces the inaugural opening of the newly created Digital Cinematography Center, located on the East end of the Exhibit Hall. The center will be the hub where Filmmakers, Broadcasters and Production Professionals; regardless of medium; can explore the creative and technical advancements you can offer them- today and in the future.

The Digital Cinematography Center will be a Hands-On forum; another place to showcase offerings for Digital Cinematography and related support; in action. If you are involved in High Definition, Standard Definition or Film acquisition options, HD 24P, HD pre & post production solutions, and want to update yourself on the latest the industry has to offer, you will want to attend the Digital Cinematography Center at the Rocky Mountain Film and Video Expo .

We are planning an extensive hands-on, interactive experience for the attendees; complete with camera set, lights and of course, the Digital Cinematography Screening Room. Host to daily seminars centered around high definition, digital and film related topics; and an exciting schedule of High definition, 24P programs, shorts, trailers; side-by-side comparisons between 24P and 35mm film. Films shown include the Rocky Mountain preview of Sony's Dreams. Steven Poster of the American Society of Cinematographers, Larry Thorpe of Sony and Bill Russell of ARRI are all expected to attend the Center. Hope to see you there!

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Noise From All Over
Newsletter Editor: R.W. Abraham
CPBE/ Regional Engineer Cox Cable Wichita
SBE Chapter 3 - Kansas

During a recent FCC visit to one of the Cox Cable systems in Western Kansas, Brad Gilliland, FCC Field Inspector, noticed an oddity on the EAS log. This cable system was supposed to be monitoring KZLS -FM for its LP-1 and KKJQ-FM on 97.3 Mhz for its LP-2. Brad mentioned it looked as though a wrong FIPS code had been entered into the set up of the EAS decoder. The LP-1 station was recorded as assigned, but the LP-2 station call letters read WKBC. In researching what might be wrong, I looked up the call letters of WKBC, and found they belonged to a North Carolina FM station on 97.3 Mhz! Our FIPS codes seemed to be correct.

Bruce Bradley, MTC Technician for Cox in Wichita, got to the bottom of the problem with a telephone call to KKJQ-FM. He discovered in talking to the engineer at the station, that a cluster of seven or eight radio stations were run out of the same location, and that they were using the marketing name of "Western Kansas Broadcast Center", thus the WKBC on the log. He assured Bruce the cable system was monitoring the proper station and even called the State EAS Coordinator to explain the situation. What a coincidence!

Thanks to a 1969 clause in an addendum to a 1929 agreement between Topeka's WIBW, AM 580, and KKSU, Kansas State University's campus radio station. The share-time agreement, which allows KKSU to use WIBW's frequency for five hours each weekday, was revised in 1969 to add 15 minutes. Almost inconsequentially, the revision also gives WIBW the broadcast rights to K-State "varsity football games." No one back then could have envisioned what big business it would be 33 years later. In December, the school's lawyers were asked if the clause would affect a proposed five-year, $6 million deal to award KSU's radio rights in all sports exclusively to Wichita-based Mid-America Ag Network. The deal would quadruple K-State's earnings for radio broadcasts and be a buffer against the rising costs of major-college athletics. WIBW says it will enforce the clause, protecting their rights and nixing the exclusivity of the award to Mid America Ag Net. What power words have!

A retired Hoisington preacher plans to silence skeptics who don't think that he -- or his 30-year-old mule -- can complete a 129-mile journey along the Santa Fe Trail. The Rev. Dick Ogle and his mule, June Thunder, have a combined age of 102, but when Ogle heard about a trail ride along part of the Santa Fe Trail, he wanted to be the first to sign up. "I'm a 72-year-old kid who didn't get a pony when I was 7," Ogle said. "So, I'm living it out now." The trail ride is a new event sponsored by Central Prairie Resource Conservation and Development. Riders will leave the Maxwell Wildlife Refuge in McPherson County on a Sunday and complete their journey the following Friday at Fort Larned National Historic Site. Although some participants might join the ride for one or more days, Ogle plans to make the trip from start to finish. "I haven't ridden much," said Ogle, who retired earlier this year after 26 years as pastor at First Church of God in Great Bend. He has been riding the mule six to eight miles a day in preparation for the trip. Most of you know that Dick used to have job that involved climbing communications towers. The motto on the side of his old Dodge read "Don't kill yourself, let us do it!" He retired from climbing when it began to bother his knees but did celebrate his 60th birthday by climbing 10 towers for a total of 3,000 feet. Personally knowing Dick as a gentleman and a philosopher, I'm not surprised that he eagerly sought out the opportunity to become a circuit rider, even for just a few days, nor am I surprised at him taking up raising mules. I believe he might unearth some symbolism in the study of that particular beast. Happy Trails, my friend!

Brad Dick notes in Broadcast Engineering, he has become aware we are running out of IP addresses. We have been running the addressing of the Internet on a standard known as IPv4, which supports about four billion IP addresses. We are soon going to run out simply because of the applications now demanding IP addresses for their equipment. Cell phones may claim up to 1 billion addresses by the end of this year. Sony has already announced that soon, every professional product it makes will have an IP address. Every computer used and similar auxiliary devices such as pagers and PDA's already need an IP address. In the near future every new product will need an IP address - microwave ovens, refrigerators, cars and their separate electronics, even home blood pressure monitors! You can see how quickly the four billion addresses are more than used up. The new standard will be IPv6 (Internet Protocol version six). This protocol supports 340 undecillion IP addresses ----(340 ×101036). That's enough IP addresses for every grain of sand on earth! So watch where you step, you could be interrupting an IP based communication, which might be a violation of Federal or even International law! What I want to know is where Brad found that numerical prefix!

Now that DTV is beginning to emerge in the state, an article I ran across by Doug Lung on RF measurements of DTV signals published 5/01/01 and archived in TV Technology. It is an excellent refresher course on how a 50/90 City Grade signal is derived, establishing your reference DTV coverage, and some pointers on how to do so. It is well worth printing off as a primer on the subject. Speaking of Internet addresses, Cox is switching from Road Runner to becoming its own Internet Provider. All xxx@kscable.com addresses will soon be switched to xxx@cox.net suffixes, mine included. Chapter Officers affected have new e-mail addresses, which can be found in the "Officers" section on page one. Please make note of those changes and correct entries in your address book, if appropriate. I would also appreciate it if those of you formerly using kscable would e-mail me corrections to your address so the e-mail SBE List can be updated.

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Amateur Radio News

By Tom Weeden, WJ9H

o The amateur radio satellite world is abuzz with news that the nearly three-decades-old OSCAR 7 satellite suddenly has come back to life. The bird was first heard June 21 by Pat Gowan, G3IOR-who copied and downloaded telemetry on 145.9738 MHz. AO-7 was launched November 15, 1974, and it remained operational for more than six years.

"I'm blown away," was the reaction of the original AO-7 Project Manager Jan King, W3GEY. King says that even "a cheap spacecraft built by a bunch of hams, without very many high reliability parts and without designing for a radiation dose like this, can last for 27+ years in space as far as a majority of its electronics is concerned." Following commissioning in 1974, AO-7 stopped transmitting in 1981 after a battery failure.

AMSAT, the non-profit Amateur Satellite Corporation, says it seems certain the satellite is running only off its solar panels, not from the onboard batteries, so it will only remain operational while it's in sunlight. King speculates that the batteries, which shorted as they failed two decades ago, now are "un-shorting" and causing the satellite to come back to life as long as it's in the sun.

o On May 2nd the FCC released a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ET Docket 02-98) which, if approved, would give amateurs a new, secondary, domestic (US-only) HF allocation at 5.25 to 5.40 MHz and a new LF "sliver band" at 135.7 to 137.8 kHz. In addition, amateurs would be elevated from secondary status to primary at 2400 to 2402 MHz.

The FCC has recommended permitting amateurs to operate at full legal limit on a new 5-MHz allocation, but it left open for further discussion whether to restrict band access to certain license classes. The FCC also has invited further comment on whether the band should be broken down into mode-specific subbands.

On 136 kHz, the FCC has proposed limiting output to 1 W effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP)-or 100 W PEP maximum transmitter output-and with a transmission bandwidth of only 100 Hertz. The FCC proposed to limit access to the band to General and higher-class licensees.

(Excerpts from "The ARRL Letter" and the www.arrl.org web site)

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Arbitron Portable People Meter Will Change Everything

From Chapter 124, Portland

(From http://www.arbitron.com/portable_people_meters/home.htm)

"The PPM [Portable People Meter]is a pager-sized device that is carried by consumers. It automatically detects inaudible codes that TV and radio broadcasters, as well as cable networks, embed in the audio portion of their programming using encoders provided by Arbitron. At the end of each day, the survey participants place the meters into base stations that recharge the devices and send the collected codes to Arbitron for tabulation. The meters are equipped with a motion sensor that allows Arbitron to monitor the compliance of the PPM survey participants every day - a quality control feature unique to the Arbitron Portable People Meter in the realm of media research."

Radio Ink (http://www.radioink.com) reports that "Cumulative audiences are significantly higher for all radio stations, with second- favorite and third-favorite stations experiencing the larger increases. Cumulative audiences also grow over the course of a month, but at widely different rates depending on the individual stations.

In terms of hour-by-hour audiences, the PPM is reporting lower Persons 12+ audiences for morning drive, with equivalent or slightly higher audiences in other dayparts.

Two primary concerns that were raised by representatives of the biggest radio station group owners: 1. Why isn't Arbitron testing the people meter in more than one market (Philadelphia)? 2. Why isn't Arbitron using a control group during the testing phase against which to analyze the data derived from the People Meter research?"

Arbitron compared the Philadelphia Winter book (January, February, and March) against PPM results in April. PPM gives new importance to radio stations as "background music" in stores and malls.

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Security: Number One in Our Job!

by Albert Vargas
Houston Chapter 105

Making echo from the last chapter meeting wherein an enthusiastic and positive way all of the members gave their contributions about security. They talked not only about theory, but about personal experiences that might teach us so we would not find the same adverse circumstances. Finally, this is one of the most productive ways of taking advantage of our meetings: Sharing knowledge and experiences.

There are several aspects involving security that all of us already know, but even knowing this, we could see ourselves in similar situations. Like for instance, ACCIDENTS... Small ones, big ones; who knows how to avoid them? Refer to your safety manuals, to your personal expertise, to the facilities you deal with, but avoid them. They say (I remember one Harris manual that impressed me much, saying: Do not perform any job if you are tired, or if you are alone, and something like that). You know everywhere you are going to find advice, our duty is to just remember them and practice them, regularly. Because of our job and because of our personal engineering codes, we'll never leave if we don't finish a repair or a installation, regardless of being exhausted. Let's take the necessary break, make the necessary call, eat something and after that, continue.

"There's more time than life". Observe potential dangers before proceeding in any repair or any job. Sometimes we go directly to the point without observing around. Let's take a look at those loose cables, failing breakers, or perhaps a jumped fuse....and then go ahead.

Sometimes, other people being there forgot something or left things without any indication, you do not know and you suffer the consequences from them. Who knows...they didn't meant to harm you, they just forgot the importance of COORDINATION. This might apply for teamwork.

Another aspect that affects security is the amount of constant changes being performed because of the station's operation. Sometimes you have not finished one, when you are already being required for the next, right? Well, let's organize everything in a manner that if you leave something uncomplete, some one will know that that job is still remaining, and that you did not leave it intentionally.

Take as much security training as possible in order to be prepared for any major accident. Have you taken the CRP sometime? But remember avoid each and every excessive work that might lead you to fall into a dangerous situation. This and some other commentaries were discussed in the last chapter meeting. Of course, the most valuable commentary is yours, but we hope this will help to keep present this important matter: SECURITY OVER ALL. We hope to hear from you soon.

Albert Vargas

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Vacuum-Tubed Pc Motherboard

Chapter 124, Portland OR

I could hardly believe my eyes when I saw this - a vacuum tube on a computer motherboard - to "please the discriminating audiophile". Earlier pictures appeared to show a common dual-triode, even though the board also has 5.1 audio capability included. See: www.aopen.com/products/mb/ax4b-533Tube.htm and http://club.aopen.com.tw/News/News_showAnswer_New.asp?RecNo=713&Language=English. Apparently, once the guffaws die down, this motherboard really delivers. But don't we already have enough heat problems inside there?

(Thanks to Mike Callaghan and the CGC Communicator.)

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Some Call Them Groaners!

(But we know you secretly laugh)

  • A bicycle can't stand on its own because it is two-tired.
  • What's the definition of a will? (It's a dead giveaway).
  • A backwards poet writes inverse.
  • In a democracy it's your vote that counts. In feudalism it's your count that votes.
  • A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion.
  • If you don't pay your exorcist you get repossessed.
  • With her marriage she got a new name and a dress.
  • Show me a piano falling down a mine shaft and I'll show you A-flat minor.
  • When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.
  • The man who fell into an upholstery machine is fully recovered.
  • A grenade thrown into a kitchen in France would result in Linoleum Blownapart.
  • You feel stuck with your debt if you can't budge it.
  • Local Area Network in Australia: the LAN down under.
  • He often broke into song because he couldn't find the key.
  • Every calendar's days are numbered.
  • A lot of money is tainted. It taint yours and it taint mine.
  • A boiled egg in the morning is hard to beat.
  • He had a photographic memory that was never developed.
  • A plateau is a high form of flattery.
  • The short fortune-teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large.
  • Those who get too big for their britches will be exposed in the end.
  • Once you've seen one shopping center you've seen a mall.
  • Those who jump off a Paris bridge are in Seine.
  • When the actress saw her first strands of gray hair she thought she'd dye.
  • Bakers trade bread recipes on a knead to know basis.
  • Santa's helpers are subordinate clauses.
  • Acupuncture is a jab well done.
  • Marathon runners with bad footwear suffer the agony of defeat.

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Humor

This psychiatrist walks into his waiting room and sees two men. One is hanging upside down from the ceiling. The other is sawing an imaginary piece of wood. The doctor approaches the man who is sawing and asks him what he is doing.
"I'm sawing wood," the man replies.
"And what's your friend doing?" the doctor asks.
"Oh, he thinks he's a light bulb."
"Well, don't you think you should tell him to get down? The blood is rushing to his head."
"What, and work in the dark?"

Once upon a time, in a land far away, a beautiful, independent, self-assured princess, happened upon a frog as she sat contemplating ecological issues on the shores of an unpolluted pond in a verdant meadow near her castle. The frog happened into the Princess' lap and said: "Elegant Lady, I was once a handsome Prince, until an evil witch cast a spell upon me. One kiss from you, however, and I will turn back into the dapper, young Prince that I am and then, my sweet, we can marry and set up housekeeping in yon castle with my Mother, where you can prepare my meals, clean my clothes, bear my children, and forever feel grateful and happy to do so." That night, on a repast of lightly sautéed frogs legs seasoned in a white wine and onion cream sauce, she chuckled to herself and thought: "I don't think so!!"

I got the best answering machine message the other day: "Hello, we're probably at home - just avoiding someone that we don't like. Leave your name and number at the tone. If we don't call you back, it's probably you. beeeeeeeeep"

My wife won't let me do this, but I would love to have the outbound message on our answering machine say in essence, " ... if you want to leave a personal message, please begin speaking after the tone. If you wish to sell something, please leave your message before the tone. Thanks."?

Three Little Words
Besides "I love you," what three words does a wife want to hear most? "I'll fix it."

Sea Change
A fishing pal said to his buddy, "It seems that when you start talking about the fish you caught, the size changes depending on who you are talking to. How come?" "Well," said the friend, "I never like to tell someone more than I think they'll ever believe."

JOKE OF THE DAY: 60 WORDS PER MINUTE
"So tell me, Ms. Harris," the interviewer asked, "have you any other skills you think might be worth mentioning?" "Actually yes," said the applicant modestly. "Last year I had two short stories published in national magazines, and finished a novel." "Very impressive," he commented, "But I was thinking of skills you could apply during office hours." The applicant explained brightly, "Oh. that was during office hours."

Did you hear that Anheuser-Busch has taken over the Red Cross' public relations? Their new slogan is "This Blood's For You!!

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Etc.

Newsletter Committee

Bill Harris
  (303)756-4843
   bharris4@ix.netcom.com

Garneth M. Harris
  (303)756-4843

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