A monthly newsletter by Society of Broadcast Engineers Chapter 48

July 1999


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Contents

The June Meeting
Upcoming Meetings And Happenings
Ben Dawson Looks at the AM Cross-Field Antenna
Job Postings
Where are they now?
Proposed Rulemaking Could Change All Spectrum Allocations
Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo '99 Coming To Denver In October!
SBE Amateur Radio News
Letter from Chuck
Towair Query Now Available Through Internet
Radio listening beats CD's in Cars
Ham News
Obsessed With Audio Processing?
Cable TV Must-Carry Rules Change
A Nationwide Shortage Of Ten Digit Telephone Numbers
PDX Radio Waves
FCC Closes Wireless Reference Facility
Check On Your Broadcast Auxiliary Licenses
Frequency Coordination & Other Stuff
An Interesting Web Site
Vacation Pay
The Wisdom of Supermodels
Letters to God
Etc.

The June Meeting

This month's meeting took place on June 17 at Ceavco Audio-Visual, located at 1650 Webster Street in Denver. A handful of members gathered to participate in a demonstration of Leitch's disk based news server system.

SMPTE chairman, Rome Chelsi led off the meeting with introductions and a call for volunteers to serve on the board for the local SBE and SMPTE chapters. Chapter elections for SBE chapter 48 are coming up in November, and it would be nice to see some new faces.

Next, Eric Schultz, SBE chapter 48 chairman, gave a brief rundown of upcoming chapter events. Eric also touched on what SBE national calls "The Year of Certification." National is promoting the SBE certification program in several ways. Among the programs emphasizing certification, the SBE is encouraging chapters to host a "certification night" meeting to familiarize local broadcasters with the certification program and the advantages of becoming certified. Chapter 48 plans to hold this program in November of this year.

Next, Eric handed the program over to Jim Peacher of Leitch. Jim gave a presentation highlighting Leitch's video server technology. Jim began by outlining the history of video on disk. Around 1994 ASC and Tektronics introduced basic video disk recorders (DDRs). These devices stored video on SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) disks and typically had only a couple of channels for video input and output. Next, peer to peer systems emerged with network connections between two or more DDRs. The next step allowed central storage of video data on a RAID (Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks) controller. The drives in the RAIDs were also SCSI devices.

Leitch has begun using fibre channel drives in their RAID arrays. Fibre channel drives are able to deliver higher data rates than SCSI arrays. Leitch uses their drive arrays in a fibre channel arbitrated loop. The loop is a network containing a drive array for central storage, as well as a number of servers that allow multiple video I/O channels. The arbitrated loops can be connected to other arbitrated loops using Leitch's Data Streamer, to a tape-based archive system using the Archive Streamer, or to a Wide Area Network (WAN) using the WAN Streamer.

Jim's presentation was followed by a demonstration by Steve Cooperman of Leitch's non-linear news editor, the Newsflash. One of the nice features of the Newsflash system is the multiple ways that editing can be performed on the system. The Newsflash, which runs on Windows NT can be controlled by a CMX- style keyboard, by a mouse, or by an edit controller which contains a shuttle knob, automated slider bars for audio and several user-assignable buttons.

Thanks to Leitch, Jim Peacher, Steve Cooperman and Ceavco for this informative presentation. Join us in July for the Nth Annual Picnic on Lookout Mountain. The picnic will be held on Wednesday, July 21st at noon at KWGN's transmitter site.

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Upcoming Meetings And Happenings

July 21 - World Famous Picnic on Lookout Mountain at the KWGN TV site.

August 31 - September 3 - NAB Radio Show, Orlando, FL

August 18 - Backup Power - Dennis Roundtree - Plannergy, Inc.

September 15 - Burst Video will host our meeting.

September 24 - 27 - Audio Engineering Society 107th Convention - Jacob K. Javits Center, NY, NY

September 29 - October 2 - RTNDA - International Conference & Exhibition, Charlotte, NC

October 6 - 7 - Rocky Mountain Film and Video Expo

November 17 - SBE Open House / Certification Night, 1999 Chapter 48 Elections

November 19 - 22 -141st SMPTE Technical Conference & Exhibit, New York, NY, December 15 - Lunch at NDTC, 12 noon

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Ben Dawson Looks at the AM Cross-Field Antenna

Chapter 124, Portland

The Cross-Field Antenna (see May 1999 issue of WCN) is continuing to raise eyebrows and elicit skeptical guffaws. Ben Dawson of Hatfield and Dawson in Seattle commented to the CGC Communicator:

"Dr. Bill Bayha of Harris and I traveled to Egypt to make measurements of the actual performance of the Hatley/Khabbary antenna. Because the Nile Delta is an area of very high conductivity (much like parts of the California Central Valley) and because of its ease of access to Cairo, we requested that the measurements be made at the Tanta installation. Tanta is the largest city in the Delta between Cairo and Alexandria, and the antenna is located at the edge of the city, adjacent to agricultural land for many kilometers to the north. Although we made very careful observations of the potential for reradiation from other antenna structures on the site, and of the measured field from the antenna, we were unable to verify the power input to the antenna or its impedance/bandwidth characteristics, because we were not given access to the input matching system, despite earlier assurances of access.

From these measurements, and from observation of the approximate power fed to the antenna from the transmitter used, a very ancient Tesla 30 kW unit operating at somewhat lower power, we have determined unambiguously that the antenna efficiency is almost exactly what would be expected from a moderately lossy very short radiator....

"Until valid repeatable measurements by independent observers with properly calibrated equipment can be made of both field strength and input power and impedance, it is not possible to say much more. In my view if the input impedance circumstances can be resolved favorably the antenna may have some application for specialized uses, but it not a good solution for very many if any medium wave broadcast situations.

Dr. Alberto Fassio of RAI in Italy is constructing one for just such tests, and when completed his installation should resolve the exaggerated claims for this antenna's performance."

(Sidenotes: Tesla transmitters were made in Prague, Czech Republic. Nicola Tesla, 1856-1943, was a Serbian-American. There's a Tesla museum in Belgrade. Hopefully it'll still be there when the bombs stop falling.)

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Job Postings

As a service to SBE/SMPTE membership, technology positions in the Rocky Mtn. region are posted at no charge. Please send your posting to:

Rome Chelsi
71610.777@compuserve.com

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Where are they now?

A number of newsletters have been returned due to postal delivery problems. Does anyone have addresses for these folks? Please e-mail your information to Bill Harris at: BHARRIS4@IX.NETCOM.COM or mail to the address on this letter.

Greg Blanchard
Chris Imlay
David G. Jones
Brad Torr
Walter Gish
Jonathon Muusse
Margaret C. Durham
Samuel C. Lay

Thanks!

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Proposed Rulemaking Could Change All Spectrum Allocations

Tom Smith, Chapter 24

The FCC has issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that could change how all spectrum is allocated and how licenses are granted. They have made a number of proposals that would expand their authority to use auctions to determine who gets granted licenses to use various parts of the radio spectrum. This docket is titled Revised Competitive Bidding Authority and the docket numbers are, WT Docket No. 99-87, RM-9332, FCC 99-52.

When Congress gave the FCC the authority to conduct auctions to determine winners of contested licenses, the auctions were to be limited to cases where several applicants were contesting the grant of exclusive use of a frequency as in the case of broadcasting, or for a band of frequencies in a specific geographic area such as PCS. Except for broadcasting, the contested frequencies to be auctioned were also limited to those used for subscription services such as wireless phones or Pay TV services such as MMDS or DBS.

Services that could not be auctioned included frequencies that were to be used by private non-subscription services, such as those used by governments and business for internal communications. These services would include two- way land mobile and private point to point microwave. These frequencies are usually granted on a first come basis and are non-exclusive and shared with the aid of some kind of coordination method.

The FCC is now proposing that these and most other previously non-auctionable frequencies now be auctioned. One method that the FCC is proposing is that these frequencies be made exclusive by changing the way they are allocated. They would allocate blocks of these frequencies to geographic areas across the country. Then licenses would be auctioned for these blocks with the winner getting the right to lease these frequencies to other users. In this scenario, ABC Taxi who needs a frequency to contact it's cabs or XYZ Manufacturing that needs a microwave to transmit data and phone between plants on opposite sides of town would be required to go to these licenses to get a frequency to use, instead of the FCC. The licenses for these blocks of frequencies would be call Band Manager Licenses. Public safety frequencies would be exempt from auctions.

In this notice, the FCC has made proposals that could require all or nearly all spectrum not used by government or public safety to be auctioned to and controlled by private parties.

Mobile Radio Technology, a mobile radio industry magazine, printed an editorial in May and its legal columnist wrote an article in the June issue calling for industry reaction to the notice. A couple of their complaints are that the FCC is trying to ignore its duty and place control of all spectrum in the hands of a few large corporations. They claim that it will be impossible for small business to compete in this environment.

This notice was adopted on March 19, 1999 and released on March 25, 1999. It was published in the FEDERAL REGISTER on May 3, 1999 on pages 23,571- 23,590. Comments were due on July 2, 1999 and replies are due on August 2, 1999.

From The FEDERAL REGISTER and MOBILE RADIO TECHNOLOGY

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Rocky Mountain Film & Video Expo '99 Coming To Denver In October!

AUTHOR

DENVER, Colo. - (June 16, 1999) - "Cool Gear and Hot Ideas" is the theme for the Rocky Mountain Film and Video Expo '99, produced by ExpoMasters Inc. This dynamic event is scheduled for October 6-7, 1999 in The John Q. Hammons Convention Center at the Holiday Inn - DIA near Chambers and I70.

The Rocky Mountain Film and Video Expo is designed to showcase cutting-edge technologies, demonstrate new equipment and techniques and provide solutions for the increasingly sophisticated and challenging needs of both creative and business professionals. The Expo provides easy access to over 150 manufacturers exhibiting their latest products, 30 Short Takes presentations on "hot" industry topics and numerous opportunities to network with colleagues and production partners. Last year's event boasted record attendance, and Expo '99 is expected to be even more successful.

Don't miss this exciting event!

For more information, contact Mark Cramer at ExpoMasters, Inc. at (303) 771- 2000, or e-mail him at mcramer@expomasters.com .

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SBE Amateur Radio News

SBE Chapter of the Air: HamNet meets the second Sunday of each month at 0000 GMT on 14.205 MHz. Hal Hostetler WA7BGX is the Control Station. Any amateur operator is welcome and encouraged to participate.

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Letter from Chuck

I really think Chuck meant this for a bunch of people, and I wanted to share his enthusiasm and e-mail address... so I doubt he'd mind me passing this along to you guys.

From: Chuck Kelly [mailto:ckelly@bdcast.com ]
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 1999 8:33 AM
To: Baumgartner, Fred M
Subject: Howdy

Hi Fred !

I just got the latest Denver SBE/SMPTE newsletter, and read about all the cool things you guys are doing. What a blast! Denver has always been way out ahead - and you no doubt have played a major role in that. Congratulations.

I am still in Quincy, and more or less inactive on the SBE front, with the exception of my activities in the International area. After serving for so long, it is good to be able to focus on work and home a bit...

Hope to catch up with you one of these days - I miss the chats.

73,

Chuck

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Towair Query Now Available Through Internet

The FCC's Wireless Telecommunications Bureau is providing public access to its TOWAIR Query through the Internet. TOWAIR Query is a landing facility slope calculation program used to determine whether a structure with an overall height of 200' (61 meters) or less, that does not meet the 20' (6 meter) exclusion criteria, requires FAA notification and FCC registration. For general info, see:
http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/1999/db990528/pnwl9129.txt

Go directly to the TOWAIR page by visiting: http://gullfoss.fcc.gov:8080/cgi-bin/ws.exe/beta/genmen/tow_air.hts

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Radio listening beats CD's in Cars

Chapter 70

Although consumers enjoy listening to a variety of music for entertainment, more adults listen to the radio (96 percent) than CDs (75 percent) and cassettes (73 percent), according to a study conducted by the Consumer Electronics Manufacturing Association. In a survey of 1,000 consumers ranging in age from 18 to 65, seven out of 10 said radio is the medium they choose most often the car.

In their homes, respondents said they listen to radio using these products: component stereo system - 54% portable boombox - 47% clock radio - 42% compact stereo system - 37% headset radio/cassette player - 25% computer - 17% Income also influences listening preferences according to the research. While at home, household with incomes over $40,000 listen mostly to CDs (43 percent) compared to lower income households (26 percent).  Females and young adults ages 18-24 prefer cassettes. Those over age 64 listen the least in all formats. (Source: Radio World)

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Ham News

Tom Weeden, WJ9H, Chapter 24

Amateur Radio will be back on board when the Great Circus Train makes its annual run between Baraboo and Milwaukee this summer. Special event station W9R will operate on HF from aboard the train during its annual journey in July. Current plans call for operation on the 40-, 20-, and 15-meter bands. Members of the West Allis Radio Amateur Club will operate special event station W9C from the show grounds once the train reaches Milwaukee. Ham radio first rode the rails with the circus train in 1965. Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) members aboard help handle communication along the route and in Milwaukee, at the show grounds. (Thanks to Jim Romelfanger, K9ZZ, Baraboo)

The next Space Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX) mission and the only one scheduled for 1999—could launch July 22 aboard shuttle mission STS-93. However, that date is said to be still "under review." STS-93, which will carry the Chandra Observatory into orbit, has been delayed several times already. The STS-93 Mission Commander is Eileen M. Collins, KD5EDS. Also aboard will be Mission Specialist Michel Tognini, KD5EJZ, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman, KC5ZTH. Students at five schools—in Texas, Rhode Island, Virginia, and Florida are on the list to talk to the STS-93 crew via Amateur Radio.

Terry Sterman, W9DIA, the founder of Milwaukee's Amateur Electronic Supply, died March 30. He founded AES in 1957 when he was just 18. Sterman passed away at age 60 after being in ill health for several years. AES changed hands last year and is now owned by Amateur Electronic Supply LLC.

(Excerpts from The ARRL Letter; and June 1999 QST Magazine)

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Obsessed With Audio Processing?

Excerpt from the MicroCon Newsletter by Jim Somich
Chapter 124, Portland

If you have not already subscribed to audioprocessing@onelist.com, I strongly suggest that you do. I have learned much in less than one week and I am sure my learning will continue. I'll wager that most of the other members are finding the discussion very illuminating also. To subscribe, just click here http://www.onelist.com/subscribe/audioprocessing. It's free, of course. There is a lot of traffic on the group, so if you don't want your regular mailbox clogged, I suggest you get a free box from hotmail.com and direct all group mail to it. Or you can subscribe to the audioprocessing digest and just get one big e-mail a day." I subscribed for a week and got an average of 50 messages a day, many from Bob Orban and Frank Foti. The digest is the way to go, if you have the time to read it all.

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Cable TV Must-Carry Rules Change

Madison Chapter 24

The FCC recently adopted a Report and Order affecting the definition of television station "markets" as they apply to the cable television 'must- carry' rules. Effective January 1, 2000, the market area will be the Designated Market Area (DMA) as specified in the 1997-98 DMA Market and Demographic Rank Report published by Neilsen Media Research. This will affect only commercial television stations; non-commercial educational television stations continue to have must-carry rights within their Grade B contours.

As a result of the FCC's order, the Nielsen DMA will become the basis for market definitions in all 50 states commencing with the 1999 must- carry/retransmission-consent election cycle. Like ADIs, DMAs generally follow county lines, but again, large counties may be split between two markets.

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A Nationwide Shortage Of Ten Digit Telephone Numbers

Portland Chapter 124

In 1991, the United States had 119 area codes in service. Today, that number has almost doubled, with 215 area codes. Current projections show that the North American Numbering Plan may completely run out of area codes within the next ten to fifteen years if no action is taken. See how the telephone industry might stretch the life of its current ten digit numbering system by visiting:
http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/1999/db990527/nrcc9032.txt

(The CGC Communicator is published for broadcast professionals in So. California by Communications General Corporation (CGC), consulting radio engineers, Fallbrook, CA)

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PDX Radio Waves

Michael D. Brown N7AXC CSRE
Brown Broadcast Services, Portland

The new era of broadcast spectrum auctions has begun. Two-hundred sixty-five broadcast allocations, including 144 FM stations, will be granted to the highest bidders beginning this September 28.

After seeming to imply that there would be no more extensions, the Commission has once again agreed to extend the comment period for the Low Power FM Proposed Rulemaking. Requesting the extension this time was NPR, The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), and the NAB. The NAB had been pushing for an extension to the end of the year, to allow completion and evaluation of the field testing for the latest-generation of IBOC digital radio systems. In the end, the FCC extended the period another 60 days, to August 2. Meanwhile, Chairman Bill Kennard chided the assembled industry leaders at an April 20th NAB Convention luncheon for whining "...that 'the sky is falling,' even before the rulemaking comments have been filed". This issue is shaping up to be one of the most contentious and potentially volatile in modern radio history. I wouldn't be surprised if there are attempts at Congressional intervention and budget blackmail to thwart implementation of the service.

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FCC Closes Wireless Reference Facility

The FCC has announced that it is closing the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau's reference facility in Gettysburg, PA. The reason the FCC closed the facility was because of lack of usage and that most of the information was available on the FCC web site and at the FCC's reference facility in Washington. This action was adopted and released on March 24, 1999 and will be effective on July 20, 1999. The notice was published in the FEDERAL REGISTER in May.

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Check On Your Broadcast Auxiliary Licenses

Tom Smith, Chapter 24

The FCC has made broadcast auxiliary data available on the Web as part of its Universal Licensing System implementation. As part of the implementation of ULS, the FCC would like all broadcast licenses to review their data and notify the FCC of any errors by July 1, 1999. The FCC released the request for this review on May 7, 1999.

To access the database via the Internet, go to "http://www.fcc.gov/wtb/database_info.html" and click on "Search the Wireless Databases Online." You will find a menu that allows you to search by a number of methods, including searches by frequency and county. The client/child site works well, as all that is needed is the broadcast stations call letters to find it’s auxiliary information. The full database can be downloaded in a series of zip files. If any of the information is incorrect or missing, a copy of the license should be sent to the FCC with missing information clearly noted.

They should be sent to:

Federal Communications Commission
Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
Information Technology Division
1270 Fairfield Road
Gettysburg, PA
17325-7245

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Frequency Coordination & Other Stuff

Everett E. Helm W7EEH CPBE
Oregon Public Broadcasting
Chapter 124

The FCC announced via Public Notice on May 7th that they soon will be converting the Broadcast Auxiliary to the Universal Licensing System. To begin the transition, they would like all Broadcasters to review the FCC BAS database online for correctness, and completeness. Corrections can be made online, and if you have a license that does not appear in their database, they ask that you send them a copy of the license. (If they don't have it, what happened to it?) For broadcasters with just a few BAS licenses, it won't be too bad a job, as you can query the database directly online. For the larger stations, checking all the licenses would be tedious at best. I would like to download the database, and do some checking offline, but the thing is huge! Way too big to download, and manipulate. I've asked the FCC to see if they can sort it out by state or region to allow a smaller file size, but frankly, I don't expect any relief. This is a problem expressed by other coordinators around the country too. Check the May 7th Public Notice for all the details, at the FCC.gov website.

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An Interesting Web Site

Eric B. Schecter, CBRE
Chancellor Media Corp.

Hi Group,
Check out this site and see what they are up to on the other side of the pond:
http://www.maycom.nl/

They have some intersting products that might be very useful--portable digital recorders with no moving parts, for starters.

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Vacation Pay

AUTHOR

January 4, 2000

Dear Valued Employee:
Re: Vacation Pay

Our records indicate that you have not used any vacation time over the past 100 year(s). As I'm sure you are aware, employees are granted 3 weeks of paid leave per year or pay in lieu of time off. One additional week is granted for every 5 years of service. Please either take 9,400 days off work or notify our office and your next pay check will reflect payment of $8,277,432.22 which will include all pay and interest for the past 1,200 months.

Sincerely,

Automated Payroll Processing

(with thanks to Mike Snyder at NDTC)

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The Wisdom of Supermodels

Rome Chelsi came up with these for your collection of management articles.

ON COURAGE.
"They were doing a full back shot of me in a swimsuit and I thought, Oh my God, I have to be so brave. See, every woman hates herself from behind."
-- Cindy Crawford

ON SELF-ESTEEM.
"I loved making 'Rising Sun.' I got into the psychology of why she liked to get strangled and tied up in plastic bags. It has to do with low self-worth."
-- Tatjana Patitz

ON PRIORITIES.
"I would rather exercise than read a newspaper."
-- Kim Alexis

ON TRAVEL.
"I haven't seen the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, the Louvre. I haven't seen anything. I don't really care."
-- Tyra Banks

ON BREAKTHROUGHS.
"Once I got past my anger toward my mother, I began to excel in volleyball and modeling."
-- Gabrielle Reece

ON THE BASICS.
"It's very important to have the right clothing to exercise in. If you throw on an old T-shirt or sweats, it's not inspiring for your workout."
--Cheryl Tiegs

ON TRAGEDY.
"The worst was when my skirt fell down to my ankles, but I had on thick tights underneath."
-- Naomi Campbell

ON ECONOMICS.
"I don't wake up for less than $10,000 a day."
-- Linda Evangelista

Frederick M. Baumgartner

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Letters to God

From Fred Baumgartner

Ms Walker came up with this one... some of these I've wondered myself... Letters to God from children:

Dear God: Instead of letting people die and having to make new ones, why don't You just keep the ones you have now?
Jane

Dear God: It rained for our whole vacation and is my father mad! He said some things about you that people are not supposed to say, but I hope you will not hurt him anyway.
Your friend (but I am not going to tell you who I am).

Dear God: Please send me a pony. I never asked for anything before. You can look it up.
Bruce

Dear God: If we come back as something, please don't let me be Jennifer Horton, because I hate her.
Denise

Dear God: I want to be just like my daddy when I get big, but not with so much hair all over.
Sam

Dear God: I bet it is very hard for you to love all the people in the world. There are only four people in our family and I can never do it.
Nan

Dear God: My brother told me about being born, but it doesn't sound right. They are just kidding, aren't they?
Marsha

Dear God: If you watch me in church Sunday, I'll show you my new shoes.
Mickey

Dear God: We read Thomas Edison made light. But in Sunday School, we learned that you did it. So I bet he stole your idea.
Sincerely, Donna

Dear God: I do not think anybody could be a better God. Well, I just want you to know that I am not just saying this, because you are God already.
Charles

Dear God: I didn't think orange went with purple until I saw the sunset you made on Tuesday. That was cool. Eugene

Dear God: Maybe Cain and Abel would not kill each other so much if they had their own rooms. It works with my brother.
Larry

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Newsletter Committee

Bill Harris........(303)756-4843 email: bharris4@ix.netcom.com
Garneth M. Harris..(303)756-4843
Andre' Smith.......(303)556-3549 email: asmith@carbon.cudenver.edu

Views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the Societies, its officers, or its members. We regret, but are not liable for, any omissions or errors. The Denver SBE and SMPTE Newsletter is published approximately twelve times per year. It is prepared with a combination of text and graphic data. Submission deadline is 10 days before the last day of each month. Other SBE or SMPTE chapters are permitted to use excerpts if attributed to the original authors, sources, and/or the Denver SBE/SMPTE Newsletter.