A monthly newsletter by Society of Broadcast Engineers Chapter 48

August 2000


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Contents

Chapter 48's Next Meeting
The July 2000 Meeting
Upcoming Meetings And Happenings
Job Postings
NAB Bestows Award on Mike Dorrough
Clark Wire and Cable Introduces Handy Booklet
FCC Finalizes Important 2 GHz Issues
SBE Highlights
Certification
RFYellow Locates RF Resources on the Internet
Virus Authors Exploit Human Weaknesses
Clay's Corner
ARRL Bulletin 30 ARLB030
Sanyo to Integrate Waves' MaxxBass Audio Technology Into Next Generation TVs
3Dlabs Oxygen GVX1 Drives Mission: Impossible 2 Title Sequence
Anti-Aircraft Guns At KHJ - 1940s
Self-Oscillating Preamps
Etc.

Chapter 48's Next Meeting...

... will be held on Wednesday, August 16. The meeting will be hosted by Burst Communications and Leader Instruments.

11:30 luncheon hosted by Burst 8200 S. Akron St. Suite 108,Englewood, CO 80112, 303-649-9600

12:00 - 1:00 technical presentation: Tony Walker of Leader Instruments will provide a presentation on Using the HD Waveform Monitor & Audio Surround Sound Monitor.

RSVP required: Diane Townsed (303) 649-9600 or email: dianet@burstvideo.com

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The July 2000 Meeting

The July 2000 World Famous picnic meeting at the Channel 2 transmitter site on Lookout Mountain was an unprecedented success. While no official numbers are available, and some of these could be "repeat customers", Bennett's BarBQ served 65 lunches! The weather cooperated 100%, no rain whatsoever. Lots of good food and conversation amongst the attendees. It was hinted that this may have been the largest assembly of technical types at such an event and such an altitude.

SBE Certification Chair Fred Baumgartner was overheard to say, "Given the great turn-out and support from Burst and RIA in particular... I think we need to send out a big thank-you. We need to recognize that Peter Douglas has been the biggest supporter of this event... He built the "veranda" at TV-2, sponsored the TCI underwriting for all these past years, and sponsored the Burst participation. Likewise, Rome made all the calls, and arrangements and championed the RIA role." We think there were a bunch of folks in attendance who would find no argument with that assessment.

Certainly not Steve Peck:

Thanks again for including us for your luncheon yesterday. I speak for the four of us from CJDS-DAL when I say we really enjoyed it.

Steve Peck
Senior Sales Executive

Plenty of other interesting and worthwhile get-togethers coming up as well. Check out these pages, our Web site at www.broadcast.net/~sbe48 and/or the RSVP line at 303-836-7787 for information about meetings to come.

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Upcoming Meetings And Happenings

Chapter 48's Next Meeting...

... will be held on Wednesday, August 16. The meeting will be hosted by Burst Communications and Leader Instruments.

11:30 luncheon hosted by Burst 8200 S. Akron St. Suite 108,Englewood, CO 80112, 303-649-9600

12:00 - 1:00 technical presentation: Tony Walker of Leader Instruments will provide a presentation on Using the HD Waveform Monitor & Audio Surround Sound Monitor.

RSVP required: Diane Townsed (303) 649-9600 or email: dianet@burstvideo.com


September Meeting (Tentative) CJDS-DAL hosts and provides a presentation. Steve Peck, Senior Sales Executive

September 22, 2000 (Friday) Deadline to apply to take an SBE Certification Exam during the November 10-20 local window.

October 11th University Club reception honoring Myron Oliner - Don Perez has confirmed that Myron will be there. Don is assembling some historical items on Myron's career for the event. Sponsored by Leitch, Sony, Ensemble Designs and Telestream (so far).

...and we're STILL working on: a tour of the new KDVR Fox 31 studios in Denver, a tour of the new mostly digital Clear Channel radio studios. Stay tuned!

January 19, 2000 DTV Test Equipment, Chris Noland, Tektronix- 6:30PM, KUSA

February 16, 2000 Kelly Hannig, Gentner Remote Control - 6:30PM, KCNC

March 5, 2000 (Sunday) Deadline to apply to take a certification exam at the NAB Convention in Las Vegas on April 11.

March 16, 2000 TBA

April 8-13, 2000 NAB Convention, Las Vegas, Nevada

April 21, 2000 (Friday) Deadline to apply to take an SBE Certification Exam during the June 9-19 local window.

May 17, 2000 DirecTV Tour 6:30PM

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Job Postings

As a service to SBE/SMPTE membership, technology positions in the Rocky Mtn. region are posted at no charge. Please send your posting to:

Rome Chelsi
ROMEC@compuserve.com

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NAB Bestows Award on Mike Dorrough

Short months after being recognized by the National Association of Broadcasters with a Lifetime Technical Achievement Award, Michael Dorrough is the recipient of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences Technical Achievement Award for the year 2000. For the first time in history the Academy's technology committee awarded the prize by unanimous vote.

Mike Dorrough is best known internationally as the father of technology to produce better sound for television, radio and recording. His sound enhancement concepts have been widely embraced by broadcasters worldwide. (Multi-band Audio Processing allows maximum audio loudness with no loss of clarity.)

Dorrough and his company are being honored by the Academy this year as inventor/manufacturer of the Dorrough Loudness Monitor with a patented technology developed to give broadcast and recording engineers a true indication of "loudness" as perceived by the human ear. The audio loudness monitor is also in use worldwide in television, radio and motion picture production.

Dorrough and his company are being honored by the Academy as inventor/manufacturer of the Dorrough Loudness Monitor with a patented technology developed to give broadcast and recording engineers a true indication of "loudness" as perceived by the human ear. This invention actually grew directly out of the DISCRIMINATE AUDIO PROCESSOR as a means of graphically displaying the degree of increased audio power. Dorrough realized that the perceived loudness of sound is a mathematical function of TIME and AMPLITUDE.

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Clark Wire and Cable Introduces Handy Booklet

The Clark Wire & Cable Pin Out Booklet is available to the public at no charge! This booklet consists of 31 pages of definations, pin outs and conversion charts that are a must have for any engineer. It was specifically designed to be a pocket-sized reference guide. It has everything from pin out configurations for connectors from XLR to FK37 to a nanosecond chart. Please contact your sales representative and request your complimentary copy today.

The Clark Wire & Cable Pin Out Booklet is just one of the tools we have designed to help make life a little easier for engineers and techs. Another step Clark Wire & Cable is taking to reach this goal is the design of our new web site. Although this site is not completed yet, we anticipate it will be done in the very near future. Our new site will allow you to access our full- line catalog on line. You will also be able to request a quote, more information or a catalog on our site. However, the crown jewel of our site will be a program that will enable you to quickly and easily design custom punched panels, rack mount panels, boxes and wall plates. After you finish your custom design, you will be able to forward it to us for a quote or print it out for your own in-house use. Until then, please contact Clark, either by phone: (800) 222-5348 or e-mail: sales@clarkwc.com to request your copy of our Pin Out Book.

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FCC Finalizes Important 2 GHz Issues

"In this Order.... we finalize the reallocation of 2 GHz spectrum for the Broadcast Auxiliary Service (BAS) at 2025-2110 MHz.... We also establish the rules under which we will provide for relocation of incumbent BAS and Fixed Service (FS) microwave licensees from (the) 2 GHz spectrum....." -FCC.

http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Engineering_Technology/Orders/2000/fcc00233.txt

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SBE Highlights

Clay Freinwald, Chapter 16

I reported at the last SBE meeting on some of the activities that are taking place at the national level. Here are some of the highlights: Elections are coming again and the nominating committee has been busy at work. One candidate for the Board I recognize: Robert Reymont. Robert used to come to Seattle from time to time when the company he worked for owned a station here. Nominations for the level of Fellow in the society are being sought. The guidelines for this level are as follows: To be considered, a member must have rendered long and conspicuous service to the society at the local or national level. This person may also qualify if recognized as having made valuable contributions to the advancement of broadcast engineering or its allied professions, the dissemination of knowledge thereof, or the promotion of its application in practice. I challenged those at the meeting to consider nominating a person from our chapter to this level. The Fall SBE meeting will be held in the Pittsburgh suburb of Mars, PA. As a board member I will be in attendance; I will also be putting on a two-hour session on EAS.

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Certification

The Society of Broadcast Engineers offers a program of certification for broadcast engineers ranging from the entry- level Broadcast Technologist to the 20-plus-years-of-experience-needed Professional Broadcast Engineer. The program includes certification for Audio Engineers, Video Engineers, and Broadcast Network Technologist, which does not include any RF related questions. SBE Certification provides recognition of your experience and knowledge in the field of broadcast engineering. It also shows others that you have made a serious commitment to stay current with new technology, regulations, and practices. For more information about SBE Certification, call Chapter 48 Certification Chair Fred Baumgartner at (303) 486-3800 or visit either the Chapter 48 Web site at www.broadcast.net/~sbe48 or the SBE national Web site at: www.sbe.org.

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RFYellow Locates RF Resources on the Internet

RFYellow is the oldest dedicated Internet search engine for finding products and services for everyone relying upon radio communications industry. It has grown to include nearly 2000 companies in the on-line database. RFYellow can help you quickly locate web sites and send email directly to the listed companies. Because the only companies listed are those providing products and services to the paging, PCS, cellular, radio, broadcast, microwave and related rf industries, you will not be overcome with search results that match the text you enter, but are not related to the radio communication industry. You can search on key words to locate specific types of rf products, which companies are in a particular city, state, zip or area code as well as which services are available in the industry. In addition there are listings and direct links to industry trade shows, radio communication organizations, regulatory agencies and access to read on-line radio industry related magazines. There is no sign-up or subscription cost to access the RFYellow database. Any company may receive free listings on RFYellow and links to their website by providing a link to RFYellow from their site and then submitting their information on-line to join RFYellow. This enables you to find many companies and consultants listed that might not be included on other fee-only based search engines on the internet. Expanded descriptions and banner ads can also be provided for a fee. Check it out at http://www.rfyellow.com. For more information contact Larry Ellis at 303-344-5486 or at larry.ellis@softwright.com.

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Virus Authors Exploit Human Weaknesses

Scott Berinato, eWEEK

At first, it didn't seem the new Life Stages virus would cause much disruption; Computer Associates International Inc. ranked it a "medium threat." But two days later, CA upgraded the risk to "medium high" as the virus ended up disrupting mail servers across the Internet. The reason: social engineering. Users have grown savvy in fighting viruses, so the new challenge for those who write them isn't how creative or damaging their script is, but rather how well they can hide the fact that they are launching a virus.

"This was clever," said Mark Sipos, a developer in Boston, who was working with companies whose servers went down last week as a result of the newest e- mail virus. "They get points for style." The ILoveYou virus was the first to use the social aspects of viruses. Because of its friendly message, experts said, and the fact that it "came from" a familiar person (since the recipient's name was in the previous recipient's Outlook address book), the virus writers increased the odds a user would open the VBS payload. The follow-up to ILoveYou, NewLove, went one step further by changing the subject line of the e-mail each time it proliferated. This decreased the chance that anti-virus software or mail filters could catch it before it reached end users and also made it difficult to warn users, since IT managers could not definitively state what the offending mail would look like in a user's in-box.

That's where Life Stages picked up. It made its entrance to e-mail as a joke, common fare in e-mail. It also changed its subject as it proliferated. No fewer than 12 subjects may have accompanied the virus. Also, instead of attaching a VBS file, Life Stages attached a Windows scrap file with the SHS extension, called life_stages.txt.shs. In many e-mail programs, the SHS extension is hidden, so users would only see life_stages.txt and likely believe it was a harmless text file. These new strains show that there's no easy way to keep up with the techniques virus writers use to mask the intention of their payloads.

Some see blocking too many files as a problem on a level with the viruses themselves. "You want to fight them, but if it looks like a real e-mail, how do you block it?" asked Fred Barling, an independent developer in Redwood Shores, Calif. "If you block files that seem real, you'll block real files with them. It's already started to happen. I sent my sister a joke e-mail and my ISP's filter kicked it back to me with a note that said, 'This looks bad.' If you can't send your sister an e-mail because your ISP is filtering at that level, you might as well shut your computer off."

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Clay's Corner

Clay Freinwald Chapter 16, Seattle

Clay's Corner Featuring News, Rumors and Views From Usually Reliable and Irrefutable Sources

Hi, there, and welcome to summer 2000! Once again the news is full of stories of drought (Southeast), heat and humidity (East Coast) or forest fires (Colorado) giving us reasons to be thankful the we live where we do. The recent reports on global warming and cities with elevated ozone levels only add to my conviction that we are truly lucky.

The shortage of good, qualified people is getting worse. The other day I was having coffee with a friend who works in the mobile communications world; he was complaining about the same thing. One guy that is trying to do something about this is Mike Scott, instructor at Bates Technical College in Tacoma. Recently Mike contacted me with the news that he had a person who was interested in becoming an intern (double take time). This last month I have had a shadow in the form of Mark Kicken who is very interested in (get this!) the RF side of broadcasting. Perhaps there is still hope.

EAS continues to be a part of my life. This past month I attended a meeting in Moses Lake where a number of counties got together to listen to NOAA's plans for shifting their forecast zones to ones that will use the EAS location code's ability to address down to 1/9th of a county. I am happy to report that the EAS is making progress.

I got a note the other day from Phil Titus of the Salt Lake chapter. They are working on the problems that are created associated with the reduction in the number of UHF channels and what to do regarding getting DTV signals into the cable systems. In an attempt to find a solution to this problem DTV Utah is working with the ATTC and several equipment vendors on an "On channel repeater system". This is going to be interesting. Just how to get DTV onto cable is another issue and one that TV retailers and equipment makers have been trying to hammer out. Thus far it looks like this is going to be difficult to accomplish without the heavy hand of the FCC.

Researchers from the U. of N.C. report that electric utility workers appear to commit suicide at a higher than average rate. They suspect that exposure to the low frequency magnetic fields upsets the body's production of melatonin and that might have something to do with it. Maybe we should be happy with our higher frequencies?

The scramble to resolve what are apparently serious concerns about the viability of 8VSB continues. It just could be that the impact of multipath on 8VSB has not really been dealt with to the degree that some would have liked. What we have here is an apparent relationship between coverage and performance in poor locations, indoor antennas, rabbit ears, etc. To me this whole thing sounds like rolling out the plane knowing that it will fly, but NOT knowing whether it will fly in poor weather. Perhaps this is what Sinclair and others have been trying to tell us. It would seem that a shoot-out of 8VSB and COFDM, using real world situations, ought to be a whole lot short of rocket science and should have been done long ago.

The FCC (hang on now) has released a PLAIN ENGLISH guide on antenna emission health and safety designed to help local officials and communities. This is really great but I wonder why the Federal Government has to make this in PLAIN ENGLISH? Could it be that local government could not understand FEDERALSPEAK? Wow! The things I could write about this, but had better not.

Want to thank Walt Lowery from Harris for a very interesting presentation on AM DAB at the last meeting. For those of you that have not been able to experience exactly what this sounds like, let me put it this way: The improvements that DAB hopes to bring to AM are nothing short of fantastic. Under ideal receiving conditions the IBOC system's improvements to FM might be hard to hear, but under almost ANY situation the improvements to AM will be discernible to just about anyone with a decent radio. If all goes well, the value of AM stations will likely increase as a result. Who knows, we might find music stations migrating to AM due to its propagation characteristics?

Take care and enjoy summer, Clay, K7CR, CPBE et al.

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ARRL Bulletin 30 ARLB030

From ARRL Headquarters
Newington CT July 21, 2000

To all radio amateurs

SB QST ARL ARLB030

ARLB030 ARRL asks for primary status at 2400-2402 MHz

The ARRL has asked the FCC to elevate the domestic status of Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services from secondary to primary in the band 2400 to 2402 MHz. The League filed a Petition for Rule Making with the FCC on July 17.

Amateurs already are primary at 2390 to 2400 and from 2402 to 2417 MHz. The ARRL says it's necessary to secure the intervening spectrum slice ''to provide some assurances of future occupancy of the band segments for the next generation of amateur satellites,'' including Phase 3D.

"It is urgent to protect the 2400-2402 MHz band due to the extensive reliance by the Amateur-Satellite Service on the future development of satellite uplinks and downlinks in that segment in particular,'' the League said.

Hams have shared their other 2.4 GHz spectrum on a secondary basis with government users. The League said it wants an allocation that's not subject to reallocation or use by ''an incompatible sharing partner.'' The City of Los Angeles recently was granted an experimental license to operate a TV downlink system in the 2402-2448 MHz band. The ARRL has protested that grant as well as a similar application from Los Angeles County. NNNN /EX

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Sanyo to Integrate Waves' MaxxBass Audio Technology Into Next Generation TVs

TEL AVIV, Israel and SAN MATEO, Calif., KS Waves, Ltd. announced that it has signed a licensing agreement with Sanyo Electric Co. Ltd. for Waves' MaxxBass(TM) audio signal processing technology. Under the terms of the agreement, Sanyo's TV & Visual Display Products Division will integrate Waves' MaxxBass technology into selected models of its next generation television sets. Sanyo is the first television manufacturer in the world to adopt Waves' MaxxBass technology. Sanyo will initially integrate MaxxBass technology into several television models that will be released in the UK later this year.

About MaxxBass

Waves' patented MaxxBass technology extends the low-frequency performance of any speaker system, providing significantly improved bass response and hence higher quality audio playback. Many speakers, particularly those used in consumer electronics appliances, cannot cost effectively convey low-frequency sounds.

MaxxBass technology overcomes this limitation by generating a sensation of low frequencies. It achieves this by replacing the original low-frequency signal with a series of harmonics in a range the speaker can play, but which "sound" to the human ear like the original bass signal. MaxxBass technology is based on Waves' advanced psychoacoustic Audio Technology Intellectual Property (IP) that enables audio device manufacturers to enhance the performance of their audio products beyond the limits imposed by engineering and cost constraints.

About Waves

Waves, Ltd. is the leading provider of Audio Technology Intellectual Property (IP). Waves' IP has been licensed to several leading companies, including Motorola and Microsoft. The Waves mission is to continue developing and providing IP that enables unparalleled sonic quality for all audio applications. Waves started operation in 1993 and is headquartered in Israel. Waves, Ltd. also maintains a wholly owned subsidiary in the United States. For more information, visit our Web site at www.waves.com.

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3Dlabs Oxygen GVX1 Drives Mission: Impossible 2 Title Sequence

3Dlabs Oxygen GVX1 Fuels Many High-Voltage Projects; Oxygen Family Noted By Industry Publications As a Superlative Workstation Graphics Accelerator

SUNNYVALE, CA --(May 25, 2000)-- 3Dlabs, Inc. announced that Tigar Hare Studios (Los Angeles) has used its award-winning Oxygen GVX1 workstation graphics accelerator throughout the creation of the Mission: Impossible 2 title sequence - enabling the rapid production of sophisticated, high-quality animation effects. Tigar Hare has also used Oxygen cards extensively on other animation projects, including work for Outback Steak House and eMachines, among others. To read more about 3Dlabs' End User Successes and to see animations of the work produced on the Oxygen family of accelerators, please visit: http://www.3dlabs.com/success/index.asp

"The Oxygen GVX1 provided excellent redraw speed that enabled us to get real- time animation approvals from our client for the Mission: Impossible 2 project," said David Hare, creative director, Tigar Hare Studios. "Our client for the Outback Steak House commercial required a photo-realistic tidal wave in very little time, and eMachines wanted a virtual fly-through of one of their computers. The phenomenal texture mapping power and geometry acceleration of the Oxygen GVX1 let us do these assignments in much less time than we had anticipated."

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Anti-Aircraft Guns AT KHJ - 1940s

(Part of a letter from Marvin Collins to Jerry Lewine re the early days of KHJ(AM), Los Angeles) I remember the early days of the KHJ present transmitter site. I can remember being a young kid about 1942 or 1943 when I had a cousin, Jim Wilson in the U.S. Army, stationed at the KHJ transmitter for guard duty. One day we visited cousin Jim while he was on guard duty at KHJ. I remember out in the fields near the towers were trailer mounted search lights, trailer mounted anti-aircraft guns and trailer mounted "big ear" listening devices. When there was an enemy aircraft alert a soldier would put on ear phones and listen with the big ears pointed in the sky to try and locate the plane. He was located on the big ear trailer and had controls for azimuth and elevation to aim the big ears at the suspect aircraft. I was too young to know about stereo but I bet those big ears were a stereo system. A synchro system made the searchlights and anti aircraft guns track the aim of the big ears. This was in the days before radar. I remember playing with the big ear controls and watching the searchlights (not turned on) and the antiaircraft guns (probably not armed) follow my commands. I also remember the big army chow truck that arrived in the evening to feed the guards. I remember joining my cousin in the chow line behind the truck and being handed a metal plate of food like the rest of the guards. Fun stuff for a kid still in grammar school. Somewhere in my picture collection I remember an old photo taken with myself, my mother and my cousin and in the background is the KHJ building with the old vertical KHJ sign showing on the front of the building. I have no personal recollection of guards being stationed at KFI but from talking to some of the retirees I have heard that Army guards were posted at the KFI transmitter too during World War II. There is a patched spot on the ceiling of the shop at the KFI transmitter that I was told was a bullet hole made when a guard accidentally discharged his rifle in the shop.... Marvin Collins, Chief Engineer, KFI-KOST

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Self-Oscillating Preamps

Two Problems Regarding the self-oscillating TV antenna preamps. This has been a problem for many years. When I was with WKYC-TV/3 in Cleveland, the transmitter supervisor, a ham, got to be very good at finding these things with a battery operated receiver with an RF pad on the input. He could have had a full time job running down the problems just in the Cleveland area. The most difficult one to find was in a mobile home park. Being a mobile home park with many metal boxes (homes) in close proximity, it was difficult to find the bad amplifier as the signal was bouncing around the park. Once the self- oscillating preamp was located, we called the antenna/preamp manufacturer about it. They were indifferent then (10 years ago). I asked if they planned to redesign the pre-amp. The answer was, "no, it's not worth that." When a bad preamp comes in, they toss it in the dumpster and give the customer a new one, gratis. Judging from the postings in the CGC Communicator and my personal experience, there are two problems in the preamp department. First, there are the occasional random preamps that go into self-oscillation, VHF or UHF. Then there are those preamps that have so much gain (or poor design) that they are likely to self- oscillate when brand new. It is the latter that pose a major health problem for the electromagnetic spectrum. Jerry Plemmons, K6JRY Systems Engineering Manager Harris Broadcast Systems jplemmon@harris.com

Following is the July 6, 2000 letter to Robert Gonsett @ CGC from Patrick A. Haney, VP/CFO of Winegard Company: We appreciate your inquiry regarding the Winegard RV amplified TV antenna. We are aware that certain information is currently being distributed concerning this product oscillating and radiating signals interfering with certain frequencies. Unfortunately, certain of the information being distributed is not accurate. The facts as we know them follow: 1. We have received isolated inquiries regarding this product possibly oscillating and radiating interfering signal. 2. We have responded to the inquiries and gathered information to help evaluate if a problem exists and when appropriate, the nature of the problem. 3. Over the life of this product which includes millions of units placed in service by Winegard, we have located approximately 50 radiating Winegard antennas. Most recently, we located and replaced approximately 10 Winegard antennas in the Chattanooga, TN area that were found to be radiating. Literally millions of this type antenna have been sold in various configurations by various manufacturers over the last twenty plus years and a very large number of these antennas are in use today. At this time we have found a few Winegard antennas to be oscillating and noted to cause interference in the 450 MHz range. The Winegard Company is a responsible corporate citizen and takes these matters very seriously. We have been and continue to actively investigate and evaluate these and any other matters concerning our products. We have no cause to believe any form of widespread significant problem exists with the Winegard RV amplified TV antenna, or for that matter, any similar product produced by any other manufacturer. Again, we appreciate your interest and the opportunity to discuss these matters with you. Please call if you would like to further discuss these or any other matters. Sincerely, WINEGARD CO.

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Newsletter Committee

Bill Harris........(303)756-4843 email: bharris4@ix.netcom.com
Garneth M. Harris..(303)756-4843
Andre' Smith.......(303)556-3549 email: asmith@carbon.cudenver.edu

Views expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the official positions of the Societies, its officers, or its members. We regret, but are not liable for, any omissions or errors. The Denver SBE and SMPTE Newsletter is published approximately twelve times per year. It is prepared with a combination of text and graphic data. Submission deadline is 10 days before the last day of each month. Other SBE or SMPTE chapters are permitted to use excerpts if attributed to the original authors, sources, and/or the Denver SBE/SMPTE Newsletter.